UFT students plant for the future on Fleming’s 50th anniversary

tree-planting

To celebrate Fleming College’s 50th anniversary, Urban Forestry Technician students Jessica Carthy and Tyler Petersen wanted to make a positive impact on the next 50+ years. After winning the Green Your Campus pitch competition, the students used the $1500 prize money to plant trees at Frost Campus.

“50 years is a long time if you ask me,” said Jessica. “Imagine what the 100th anniversary could be like if we plant more!”

Jessica and Tyler’s Green Your Campus pitch was to plant trees on campus in honour of Fleming’s 50th anniversary. The competition was co-hosted by Fleming’s Office of Sustainability, FastStart and the Trent Green Team, and featured 10 Fleming groups and 25 groups from Trent University. Projects were judged by Fleming and Trent faculty based on presentation and potential effect on meeting the college’s sustainability plan goals.

“It’s important to be staying just as green as we are gray,” said Jessica, who said her peers and professors air spaded and lifted a Kentucky Coffeetree last fall to another spot on campus to save it. “Planting trees is one of the best possible ways to help our environment. If there are trees, the insects, birds and animals will follow.”

Jessica and Tyler are increasing the tree diversity on campus with the help of Technologist Brian Saxon, using trees native to Canada and different from the existing inventory.

They decided to make the first trees planted extra special by planting them in honour of faculty members Katrina Van Osch-saxon and Tom Mikel, recognizing their excellence in teaching and passion for environmental studies. Jessica, Tyler and their Urban Forestry Technician classmates planted two Red Oak trees for Katrina and Tom because the species is hardy, native to Canada, and will thrive at Frost Campus.

Katrina thanked the students on behalf of herself and Tom at the Women in Trees event on Saturday, April 22. “We know it’s going to be planted right and pruned well,” said Katrina. “150 years from now they’ll be the two nicest trees on campus.”

Jessica said they are going to stretch the $1500 as far as possible, but hopes this idea can be used by other campuses as well. “We would love to see that more trees are planted to celebrate because future students will thank us for it,” said Jessica.

 

UFT students honour professors with Red Oak trees at Frost Campus

tree-planting

Urban Forestry Technician students had a special surprise up their sleeve for professor Katrina Van Osch-saxon and program coordinator Tom Mikel at the Women in Trees event on Saturday, April 22. The students announced they are planting trees in honour of Katrina and Tom’s teaching excellence and passion for environmental studies.

After the speaker panel, FastStart Fleming and the Office of Sustainability presented Urban Forestry Technician students Jessica Carthy and Tyler Petersen with a $1500 cheque for winning the Green Your Campus pitch competition.

faststart-presentationThe competition was co-hosted by Fleming’s Office of Sustainability, FastStart and the Trent Green Team, on March 11, 2017, and featured 10 Fleming groups and 25 groups from Trent University. Projects were judged by Fleming and Trent faculty based on presentation and potential effect on meeting the college’s sustainability plan goals. Jessica and Tyler’s pitch was to plant trees on campus in honour of Fleming College’s 50th anniversary.

While accepting the cheque, Jessica and Tyler asked their classmates to join them at the front of the Glenn Crombie Theatre at Frost Campus. Jessica announced that she and her peers would be planting the first two trees that day in recognition of Katrina and Tom for their passion in environmental studies, excellence in teaching, and creating opportunities for students.

“We are doing this for you Katrina, you are someone we admire a lot. You started Women in Trees last year and have grown it to be a wait-listed event,” said Jessica. “And Tom, you are someone we can come to with our ideas. Tom and Katrina, you work hard to see other people succeed. It is one thing to teach and another to inspire. Today two Red Oak trees will be planted where we’re doing our tree climbing. On behalf of the UFT class of 2017, we’d like to say thank you.”

The students decided to plant Red Oak trees because the species is hardy, native to Canada, and will thrive at Frost Campus.

“We know it’s going to be planted right and pruned well,” said Katrina, who thanked the students on behalf of herself and Tom. “150 years from now they’ll be the two nicest trees on campus.”

The students planted the trees while event participants enjoyed a tree climb in the beautiful weather. Women in Trees is organized by Katrina to showcase the variety of roles and opportunities for women in the fields of Urban Forestry, Forestry and Arboriculture.

Reginald Eddy makes history as first diploma student to win Prince of Wales Forest Leadership Award

reginald-eddyReginald Eddy, Urban Forestry Technician (UFT) student, has been selected for the Prince of Wales Forest Leadership Award! Reginald is one of four winners – two from Canada, two from the United Kingdom – chosen by the Canadian Institute of Forestry for an international forestry student exchange program this summer.

This award is offered to recent graduates or students in diploma, undergraduate degree or master’s degree forestry programs. Reginald is the first diploma student ever selected for the $12, 000 bursary award, which includes the opportunity to travel to the United Kingdom for an internship in interdisciplinary forest experience in policy, planning and field work.

“Having the opportunity to work in the United Kingdom is something I can barely imagine,” said Reginald, who is leaving Canada for his internship in mid-June. “Forestry management practices are very well developed in European countries and there is much for me to learn from this experience. I am looking forward most to being emerged in such a culturally significant part of the world.”

The Fleming student applied for the award to gain employment experience and further his career. He hopes the internship will further his understanding of the forestry industry and add international connections to his professional network.

“This is an incredible achievement for Reg, for our program and for Fleming College. We are so proud of him,” said Tom Mikel, Forestry and Urban Forestry Technician program coordinator, in the Fleming College news release.

Reginald said he applied to Fleming’s UFT program because he wanted a career that was both enjoyable and made an impact on environmental issues.

“Including all of the bridges the UFT program offers with Canadian universities, my experience at Fleming College has opened many doors in my career,” said Reginald. “I’m happy to say that my experience has been fantastic and I can continue my education with the confidence I have found in the Urban Forestry Technician program.”

Reginald is continuing his studies in September at the University of British Columbia to earn his Bachelor of Urban Forestry degree through Fleming’s transfer agreement.

“During my time at Fleming College, I have grown into an individual that I never thought I could become. With the support of great faculty and colleagues, I feel that on my way ‘out the door’ I am fully equipped with all the knowledge that I need to take on the challenges the urban forestry industry can dish out,” he said.

Fleming students helped save Dromoland Orchard & Stables

You may have sampled Dromoland Orchard & Stables organic apple cider earlier this week in the Sutherland Campus main foyer. Michael and Pauline Bryant, the owners of the orchard in Little Britain, were handing out cider samples to staff and students at the Mental Illness Awareness Week event, sharing the health benefits of apples. The couple said they were happy to be a part of the event and give back to Fleming as Fleming College has given so much to them.

Michael and Pauline moved to the farm on 598 Elmtree Road, Little Britain, three years ago. The property had been let go, covered with weeds, and was a mess. During a walk through the property, Michael spotted some apple trees and decided to call Urban Forestry Technician program coordinator Tom Mikel at Frost Campus to see if Tom could help. Despite Michael’s friends advising him to chop the apple trees down, Tom considered the historical aspect of the apple farm and felt it was worth saving.

“Being a bit of a history buff, especially local history and the stories of trees and heritage trees within the community, I was intrigued by Michael and Pauline’s apple trees. According to Michael’s research, he found the apple trees came from a family in Valentia Island, Ireland, who visited Canada in the 1850s with apple seeds in their pockets. They ate apples and, since they didn’t have clean drinking water, they would use apple cider for their thirst,” said Tom. “The history of this property is incredible and I wanted to be a part of saving it. At the same time, we had the added benefit of accessing an almost unlimited local location where our students can learn how to perform proper pruning skills as part of their curriculum.”

Tom brought his students to prune and cut trees, pick apples, complete identification, eradicate buckthorn and more. Over the past three years, Tom has organized 800 Urban Forestry, Forestry, Arboriculture and Ecosystem Management students to visit the orchard and gain hands-on, applied learning experience.

“The students brought such an enthusiasm to learn. Over the last three years it has created a wonderful regeneration of the orchard and is moving forward,” said Michael. “I think there is something special between Dromoland and Fleming College. We saved something that was dying—and that’s all because Tom helped. And I helped. We all helped.”