Kim Magee makes a difference as Front Porch Project photographer

As Kim Magee approaches homes in Lindsay, Ont., individuals, couples, families and sometimes even pets emerge from their front doors with a bright smile to greet her. Kim is a Front Porch Project photographer, snapping family portraits from a distance in exchange of a donation. The Fleming College graduate has raised $2,775 in the past four weeks for Kawartha Lakes Food Source.

“It’s fun, people loved it! They get to smile and there’s not a worry on their face in that moment. They’re happy and stress-free for a minute amidst it all,” said Kim, who has photographed 48 families, Caressant Care Long Term Care staff, Queen’s Square Pharmacy, South Pond Farms, Action Car and Truck Accessories, and Kawartha Lakes Paramedics, among others.

Kim is one of many photographers participating in the Front Porch Project, where photographers fundraise to help support their communities amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Kim chose to fundraise for Kawartha Lakes Food Source to help those in need, encouraging financial donations as Kawartha Lakes Food Source can turn every dollar into six dollars worth of food.

She said the experience has been a pleasure for her and has been keeping her busy. In February 2020, all of Kim’s upcoming photography bookings were cancelled due to COVID-19 concerns. When a friend told Kim about the Front Porch Project, she jumped at the opportunity to pick up her camera again and make a difference in her community.

“It felt good to be out there shooting because I hadn’t been in a while, and it’s that connection with people,” Kim shared. “Knowing we’re all in the same boat right now, it just makes you appreciate the little things more. I’m capturing this moment in time, and I’m feeling the love out there because we all need it right now.”

Kim is happy to call Lindsay, Ont. her home after moving from Emo, Ont., near the Minnesota boarder, to take the Fish and Wildlife Technician program at Fleming College’s Frost Campus.

“I grew up watching Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom, which was like a National Geographic Channel-type show. They’d capture and tag wildlife on the show and my favourite was when they went to Africa,” said Kim, who dreamed of being a wildlife photographer in Africa after learning photography in high school. “I found the Fish and Wildlife program perfect for me, because I like to explore fish and wildlife, and it would help towards my dream of being a National Geographic photographer.”

Kim developed many relationships at Frost Campus, including amazing friendships, getting married and starting a family, which is why she decided to stay in Lindsay after graduating in 1992.

“The friendships I made at Frost Campus, including my friendship with the former manager of the Mary Street Residence, they became my family. They are my family and my son views them as aunts and uncles. I got such a great foundation in Lindsay,” said Kim. “It takes a long time in a new community to set roots and make friends. If I hadn’t had those people around me, I probably wouldn’t have stayed. These people are wonderful and it’s all why I’m still here. Plus, the Lindsay area is also very similar to my hometown. It’s a great place to be!”

After graduating from Fleming College, Kim worked at a mall photo lab and would display her nature photography in the frames to help sell frames. It wasn’t long until shoppers started asking Kim to photograph their weddings, which she denied for a long time (“why would I take pictures of people?” she laughs) until she finally agreed to photograph a wedding for $50. She was hooked and has been in the business for 26 years.

“My Fleming College education has stayed with me my whole life. I know how to work with nature in both my personal life and my career,” said Kim. “And my dream of Africa has never left my head. I’ll save for the big lenses and one day I’ll be photographing big cats in South Africa. That’s the retirement goal!”

Ecosystem Management is an international adventure for Celeste Thompson

Celeste Thompson’s Fleming College experience has been an international adventure. From field work in Lindsay, Ont., to conservation initiatives in Costa Rica and a conference in Washington, D.C., Celeste is busy building her resume while making memories to last a lifetime.

“My experience at Fleming so far has been more than I could have dreamed,” said Celeste, who was born and raised in Orangeville, Ont. “The Ecosystem Management professors have made a world of difference in making the three years the best school experience of my life.”

Celeste chose the Ecosystem Management program because she loves being in the natural environment and wanted an environmental career. “The Ecosystem Management programs tie in all ends from wildlife to trees and soil and protocols. It allows for graduates to branch off to many different career paths,” she explains.

After accepting her offer to Fleming College, Celeste attended the Fleming College Open House to explore the Frost Campus before starting classes. She said it helped prepare her for college and recommends the event to future students.

“This gave me a perspective on what I was going to be getting into. I feel attending the Open House motivated me and got me more excited to attend college,” she said. “I recommend these events to students thinking about coming to Fleming.”

Celeste is happy with her program choice and loves the close-knit Frost Campus community, which she describes as supportive and feels like family. Her favourite place at Frost Campus is the back forty, the main location for class field work, which Celeste credits as the perfect space for environmental students. 

“With full confidence I would recommend the Ecosystem Management program to others. This program has made me the person I am today, and I am positive all students will leave with a special place in their hearts for EM,” said Celeste. “I am convinced the work I have done in this program will ensure my success in future endeavours as we cover a wide variety of topics to a professional and high standard.”

One of Celeste’s favourite Fleming experiences is the two-week field placement in Parismina, Costa Rica during her second year. Students who participate in this organized placement experience are selected based on a rigorous screening process. 

“That experience is something that I will always be appreciative of and drives me to follow my goals,” said Celeste, who volunteered to support Leatherback sea turtle conservation initiatives.

The Ecosystem Management adventures continued in 2020, kicking off the new year with a trip to Washington, D.C. for the National Council for Science and the Environment Conference.

This conference is organized by the National Council for Science and the Environment and features presentations on new research, innovation, and shows the power of collaboration. It engages more than 800 leaders from the sciences, education, government, policy, business and civil society to foster dialogue on environmental policy.

This experience was a nice way to start our final semester in this program,” said the third-year Ecosystem Management Technology student. “We gained lots of experience communicating with experts in the environmental field. It allowed us to grow into young professionals who are confident in our work and background.”

In addition to the conference experience, Celeste also enjoyed site-seeing in Washington. She and her peers visited the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, National Air and Space Museum and the Lincoln Memorial.

Celeste plans to graduate from the Ecosystem Management Technology program in June 2020. After graduation, she would love to travel and do contract work in her field. Since Celeste believes in lifelong learning, she may return to Fleming College to continue her education journey and earn other diplomas in relevant fields.

Fleming graduate explores coastal habitats aboard Leeway Odyssey science vessel

Ecosystem Management graduate Paul McCarney had an adventurous August on the Leeway Odyssey science vessel with Oceana Canada and the Nunatsiavut Government.

Paul, who is the Research Manager at the Nunatsiavut Government, went on a 10-day expedition to explore the coastal habitats of Nunatsiavut in Northern Labrador.

“This is an area that is important to Inuit communities in this area, and the marine environment is so important,” said Paul on the culturally and ecologically significant habitats. “We do a lot of science work, but there’s not a lot of science work at the bottom of the ocean—there’s not much exploration done there and that’s the base of the whole habitat. Through this expedition, we’ll get a better sense of this area, monitor changes, see the species, and get a better understanding of the ecosystem and what’s going on in these areas.”

The team collected data and used cameras to record the habitats in coastal bays and fjords, including kelp forests, rocky reefs and open water areas surrounded by seasonal sea ice. Watch this video filmed by Fleming Environmental Visual Communication graduate Caitlin McManus for a glimpse of what they discovered.

“Being able to see the foundational part of the habitats and the ocean and the world is extremely productive. We were able to see coral sponges, sea stars, kelp habitats… there’s so much diversity and we’re able to see it right from the bottom of the ocean,” said Paul on the expedition.

The Fleming College graduate says he uses his education every day in his role as Research Manager, describing it as key to his career. His understanding of identification and looking at images in quadrants, assessments, social and political impacts, and more, are just some of the skills Paul uses daily that he gained at Fleming.

“What I love about Fleming is that the programs are inter-disciplinary. There’s a focus on science, and then you apply it to the social and political issues,” said Paul. “At the Nunatsiavut Government, we’re not just focused on science, we also protect the Inuit communities, the people and the environment. So that understanding from Fleming is useful.”

Paul believes in the Ecosystem Management program so much that he came back to teach in the program for two years after graduating. “I loved it!” said Paul. “I recommend it to everyone I’ve spoken to. Everyone loves it there.”

Photo credit: Oceana Canada/Evermaven

Fleming student Mitchell Maracle named one of Canada’s top geoscience students

Earth Resources Technician Co-op student Mitchell Maracle isn’t afraid of getting his hands dirty, which is why the second-year student is excited to participate in the Student-Industry Mineral Exploration Workshop this May.

Each year, 26 of the top geoscience students from post-secondary institutions across Canada are nominated to attend this intense two-week workshop in Sudbury, Ont. This workshop, which is hosted by the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada, aims to develop future leaders of the mineral exploration and development industry.

“The Student-Industry Mineral Exploration Workshop is a highly competitive application process targeted towards university students, so Mitchell’s acceptance is a big deal,” said Joanna Hodge, Earth Resources Technician Co-op program coordinator. “I am very proud of Mitchell for his well-deserved acceptance and I know he will make Fleming College proud when he goes to Sudbury this May.”

Mitchell is looking forward to the networking opportunity, as well as learning more about the mineral exploration field.

I did my program co-op in the Yukon, helping to find economically viable mineral deposits, and I want to learn more about the industry,” said Mitchell, referring to his co-op placement at Big River Mineral Exploration. At his co-op placement, Mitchell sampled soil, staked claims, worked as a drill hand and at the sluice box, and panned for gold, among other responsibilities.

“I like this career because I like history, and this is the earth’s history, but you can find work in it. I also like that it’s science, so it’s great!” said the Fleming student.

Mitchell decided to take Fleming’s Earth Resources Technician Co-op program after earning his degree in Geography and Environmental Studies at Carleton University and travelling Australia. When he returned to Canada for a friend’s wedding, Mitchell decided he wanted to gain more hands-on skills and train towards a career.

“When I came back to Canada, I decided I should get my career going and the ERT program was right up my alley. I’m glad I chose it, it’s been perfect,” said Mitchell. “I like how hands-on and informative the program is, and I like that the class sizes are smaller—I know all of the professors and students, and the professors care if you’re struggling with anything.”

After he graduates from Fleming College, Mitchell plans to continue his studies at Acadia University, using Fleming’s education pathway to earn his Bachelor of Science in Geology with two additional years of study after Fleming.

“I enjoy learning and feel it’d be better to specialize in the field,” explains Mitchell. “I’m passionate about earth sciences and I want to learn more!”

Meet Social Media Ambassador Hilary Wright

Hilary Wright grew up with a passion for animals and nature, which is why it’s so important to her that future generations get this same opportunity.

“With our current climate crisis, I wanted to do my part to ensure future generations will be able to enjoy the wildlife we’ve all had the chance to enjoy,” she explains.

After earning a certificate in Performance Horse Handling from University of Guelph – Ridgetown Campus, Hilary enrolled in the Ecosystem Management program at Fleming’s School of Environmental & Natural Resource Sciences.

“Ecosystem Management not only educates me on how I can make a difference for the animals I care about, I get hands-on experience every week!” she explains. “I love studying Ecology because the more I learn, the more I can see how everything and every action is connected in some way. It’s both incredibly challenging and beautiful to realize how we’re all linked together.”

The second-year student says she loves the hands-on learning opportunities that Fleming College offers, as well as the amazing faculty.

“I love having the opportunity to be in the field practicing the skills I’ll use in my future career,” she said.  “Paired with having the most passionate and experienced faculty who truly take the time to know you… it’s a unique experience!”

Outside of academics, Hilary loves participating in the fun clubs and activities at Frost Campus. As a member of the Foraging and Bushcraft Club, Hilary explores acres of campus land with her club members searching for plants they can eat or craft into tools. She also loves Auk’s Lodge events, such as karaoke night, pub night, and even a Bob Ross-themed paint night.

“There are so many fun things to do on campus!” said Hilary, whose advice to new Frost Campus students is to get involved and try as many things as you can. “Whether it’s operating a drill rig, climbing a tree or trying your hand at Loggersports, there are so many once-in-a-lifetime events you don’t want to miss out on!”

Next semester, Hilary is excited to have another once-in-a-lifetime experience: she is travelling to South Africa!

Hilary and a group of Ecosystem Management students are spending the winter semester abroad through a partnership with the Askari Wilderness Conservation Programme.

“Every year, up to 10 students from EM get to spend their fourth semester living on a wildlife conservation reserve in South Africa,” said Hilary. “I can’t wait to experience this for myself!”

Hilary is enjoying her Fleming College experience so much that she is now a Social Media Ambassador with Fleming’s Marketing Department. She is creating social media content, such as Instagram Story videos and Facebook photos, that highlights her experience at Frost Campus.

“I can’t wait to show everyone the crazy things we as students get to do everyday!” said Hilary. “Whether we’re in the field planting trees, in the lab analyzing invertebrates or enjoying a pub night down in the Auks Lodge, we’re always up to something new and exciting!”

Valedictorian Hengda Liu makes nature his office

Dream big, take on challenges, and don’t quit.

Hengda Liu says this is his credo in life and he wants to share it with fellow graduates of the School of Environmental & Natural Resource Sciences at convocation, where the Forestry Technician graduate will serve as Valedictorian this Friday.

Hengda came to Fleming College’s Frost Campus as an international student from China, wanting to learn everything about nature.

“Just like many other Forestry Technician students, instead of working behind a desk we want nature to be our office,” he said. “I want to be one of those forestry professionals to seek the harmony zone between our economic needs and ecological sustainability. This is why I chose the Forestry Technician program: its outdoors, meaningful, hands-on – get my hands and boots dirty – and I get to stay in the environment where I’m supposed to be in.”

He credits the College for its efforts on making Frost Campus sustainable, and appreciates the warm and welcoming campus community.

“The faculty, staff and students here at Fleming are incredibly friendly and warm. They have never treated me differently because I am from another country or because of my language barrier,” said Hengda. “I have always felt like a part of the Fleming family, and I am really proud and grateful for that.”

Hengda said the Forestry Technician program combines theory with hands-on experience to prepare students for their careers, including fundamental skills courses like communications and applied mathematics, as well as forestry skills courses like forest inventory and forest management using GIS, among others. He describes the faculty as very supportive, helpful and “lightning fast” to respond to emails.

“I’ve truly learned a lot during my time here at Fleming and I want to pat my own back to thank myself for choosing Fleming. Great job, Hengda!” he laughs, patting his back.

The programs two field camps were Hengda’s favourite experience at Fleming. At The Canadian Ecology Centre and Haliburton Forest, students learned how to safely operate a chainsaw, canoed to an island to do a stream assessment, participated in tree planting, took forest inventory, and more.

“We basically combined the knowledge we learned in school and applied it to the real world during these two camps, with the help and supervision of forestry professionals who are working in the industry,” said Hengda, who also enjoyed networking with experienced technicians and forest managers at the field camps.

Outside of class, Hengda worked part-time at a local Chinese restaurant, Friendly Restaurant, which improved his English speaking skills and cooking skills.

“I am an okay chef now,” he said. “I love to cook some Chinese food for my friends sometimes and the smiles on their faces while they are eating my dishes is such a priceless reward.”

Moments such as this are treasured memories to Hengda, who enjoys documenting life and has a passion for video editing. He created a YouTube channel to share his Fleming experiences with others, including this beautiful tribute video for the teachers, technicians and staff of Fleming’s Forestry and Urban Forestry programs.

Video by Hengda Liu as a tribute to Fleming’s teachers, technicians and staff from the 2019 Forestry and Urban Forestry programs.

Now that Hengda has completed classes at Frost Campus, he is working full-time as a Forestry Technician at Spectrum Resource Group, a forestry consulting company in Prince George, British Columbia.

“Last shift, we went to a logging camp in a place called Ospika, BC, where you can’t even find it on the map! It’s a mountainous area and we were constantly climbing a 75% slope with tons of blowdowns and devil’s clubs,” he explained. “It’s tough but I loved every single piece of it. It’s a dream come true for me.”

He plans to continue growing his career in this field, and hopes to one day lead others in sustainable forest management and to enhance communication between Canada and China in terms of forestry.

“What I love about the Forestry Technician career path is that it is outdoors,” he said. “As a Forestry Technician, we are literally getting paid to walk in the forest. The forest is my office, birds and wild animals are my sidekicks. Nature is where I came from and I want to be there for the rest of my life.”

Michael Tamosauskas builds a ‘golden’ resume in the geological field

A thick fog quickly rolls in while Michael Tamosauskas collects glacial till samples atop a mountain in Nunavut. With his nearest colleague at least 100 metres away, Michael’s radio alerts him that an emergency helicopter pick-up is on its way before the pilot loses more visibility.

When the roar of the helicopter sounds close, all Michael can see is the thick, white fog enveloping him. “I was kind of panicking because if they couldn’t pick me up for a certain period, I would have to camp out on the tundra overnight,” said Michael.

The helicopter pilot, with Michael’s crew on board, struggles to spot Michael and, when he does, there is nowhere nearby to safely land. 

“I made the decision to sprint – and fall – down the side of this mountain to flatland, where he was able to pick me up… with him and my crew laughing at my tumble down the mountain,” said Michael.

Fleming Career Fair leads to summer employment at GroundTruth Exploration

The opportunity for Michael to spend his summer working at GroundTruth Exploration, a mineral exploration company, came from attending the annual Career Fair at Fleming’s Frost Campus. At the time, Michael was an Earth Resources Technician Co-op student looking for work experience in his field.

Michael has spent the past couple summers working for GroundTruth Exploration; first in Nunavut, later in Labrador. The company, based in Dawson City, Yukon, is involved in gold exploration projects across northern Canada and begins a new project in Alaska soon.

As an Exploration Field Technician, Michael marked soil sample site locations, collected soil samples and described their physical attributes. He worked four weeks on, one week off, and then another 4 weeks on, with workdays being seven to eight hours.

“Nunavut was a very unique place to work,” said Michael, adding that his camp was approximately 200km north of the nearest town, Rankin Inlet, and had about 200 people working there. He describes the camp as well-developed, including a wastewater treatment facility, clean washrooms, and professional chefs who cooked for everyone.

“While working in Nunavut in the summer, I was subject to 24/7 daylight, which took a while to get used to; although I was always so tired by the end of my workdays, I did not need darkness to fall asleep,” he said. “Also, the lack of trees on the tundra made it easy to spot all sorts of wildlife, such as caribou and wolves.”

He returned to GroundTruth Exploration the following summer and was assigned a project in Labrador, where he was one of a five-member crew.

“I found life in Labrador a little more rough,” Michael said, explaining that his crew assembled their kitchen/office tent, dry tent, and personal tents to sleep in. “The scenery of Labrador is gorgeous, although the bugs I had to deal with daily were horrendous. To make my workdays bearable, I needed to wear bug nets and apply bug spray on my skin every 20 minutes or so.’

‘Although, the helicopter rides and the interesting rocks I spotted up there made up for it!” he added.

This summer, Michael will be working in Dawson City, Yukon, as a Geologist, sampling soil and rock using a GeoProbe. He will then utilize X-Ray Fluorescence to determine whether the samples have high concentrations of arsenic and/or iron, which can indicate gold.

Co-op placement and applied learning gives Michael Tamosauskas a competitive advantage in geology field

Michael has always found Earth dynamics extremely interesting, so when he began exploring post-secondary options, his heart was set on geology. But with mainly college-level high school credits, Michael ran into issues trying to get into a university geology program.

He met with his guidance counsellor to research college geology programs and discovered that Fleming College’s Earth Resources Technician program features a paid, six month co-op, which he believes is incredibly valuable. Michael enrolled in the program and describes his two years at Frost Campus as an excellent experience.

“For my ERT Co-op term, I was a Geotechnical Field Technician for Golder Associates. This summer experience was an excellent foundation for my career, as I had no prior relevant work experience,” he said. “That experience on my resume has drawn interest from every job interviewer I have had so far.”

After graduating from Fleming in 2017, Michael used Fleming’s education pathway to Acadia University to earn his Bachelor of Science in Geology.

“Before I went to Fleming, I believed I was not fit to go to university. But I realized my potential throughout my two years there,” said Michael. “I give ERT faculty a lot of credit because they did a great job teaching the complex subject of geology within a two-year span and prepared me well for studying geology in university.”

Michael recommends the ERT program to others because of its applied learning opportunities, including field trips, projects within the Drilling and Blasting facility, and mandatory co-op placement.

“I found that this experience gave me quite the advantage compared to my fellow university students, since the university approach is mainly theoretical rather than practical,” he said.

Michael plans to gain more experience as a mineral exploration geologist and is interested in focusing on the business side of mining in the future. He is currently enrolled to complete his Honours project with an Acadia University professor and, once he graduates from his degree program, Michael would like to pursue graduate studies and conduct research with an economic geology professor.

A life-long interest in Africa takes Samuel Davison to Fleming College

Samuel Davison grew up watching movies and documentaries about Africa, in awe of the incredible biodiversity and ecosystems, and the flora and fauna there.

When he started researching post-secondary schools, Samuel discovered that Fleming College’s Ecosystem Management Technician program includes a mandatory two-week field placement– and one of the three organized placements is in South Africa. 

“It called to me as soon as I researched the Ecosystem Management Technician program,” said Samuel. “I knew that is where I wanted to be before I was even accepted into the program.”

And when it was his time to apply for the South Africa field placement team, Samuel leaped at the opportunity.

“I was all over it,” said Samuel on the highly competitive, rigorous screening process. “I wanted the experience, I wanted to see everything that I have been dreaming of since I was a kid, and the opportunity was right there in front of me so I thought, ‘why not?’”

After submitting his cover letter and resume, completing a fitness test, studying handbooks and project aims, and completing a written test, Samuel was selected for the 2019 Askari Wilderness Conservation Programme team.

Life-changing adventures in the Askari Wilderness Conservation Programme

The Askari Wilderness Conservation Programme gives volunteers the opportunity to contribute to the management, research and monitoring activities on Pidwa Wilderness Reserve. The goal is to secure, increase and improve wild habitats.

During his field placement, Samuel assisted with:

  • Reserve management and data capture, such as birds of prey identification and monitoring, and cheetah monitoring.
  • Sensitive tree protection, habitat rehabilitation and invasive plant control.
  • Darting and relocation of herbivore species and radio telemetry tracking of various species, including elephants and cheetahs.
  • Daily vehicle and equipment checks and fence maintenance, along with data recording.

“This whole experience is a once in a lifetime,” said Samuel. “I don’t mean to sound cliché, but being in South Africa on a conservation reserve surrounded by the most beautiful landscapes, wildlife and people is truly breathtaking.”

One unforgettable experience Samuel had in South Africa was assisting with sable antelope darting and relocation with world-renowned wildlife veterinarian Dr. Peter Rogers, veterinary nurse Janelle Goodrich, and the Askari team.

“You really learn to appreciate an animal when your hands are wrapped around its horns supporting it, feeling the heat and the life within it, your adrenaline pumping but somehow feeling at peace all at the same time. It’s a state of euphoria,” Samuel explained. “Getting this hands-on experience and education from professionals with wild sable was unforgettable and one of the fond memories I will take with me for the rest of my life.”

Samuel said his field placement experience in South Africa developed his interpersonal and teamwork skills, strengthened his work on scientific methods, and helped him make life-long connections.

“I have always been passionate about conservation and the environment, but getting this experience to me was like throwing gasoline on a fire; it completely ignited this passion that was burning inside me,” said Samuel. “It showed me where I wanted to be in the future and what kind of person I want to become. This is an experience of unbelievable value, and something that I will cherish and use to continue driving me forward in my future.”

The Ecosystem Management Technician student is especially grateful to faculty members and trip leaders/organizers Barb Elliot and Mike Fraser, who he describes as role models.

“I can confidently say that these two people have changed my life. Their combined knowledge, wisdom and outright positive and driven attitude do not go unnoticed by anyone that comes across them. They have driven me to be the best person that I can be, academically but equally as a human being,” said Samuel. “They work incredibly hard and expected the same from us, which tells me they really do care about the outcome of what kind of people we are graduating from Fleming College.”

Dean Brett Goodwin (back row, second from left), faculty members Barb Elliot (front row, centre) and Mike Fraser (front row, second from right), and the field placement team.

He was also excited that Brett Goodwin, Dean of Fleming’s School of Environmental & Natural Resource Sciences, joined his group in South Africa.

“It’s not often you get to travel with your professors, let alone the Dean! It’s inspiring to see someone you wouldn’t normally get to meet getting back into science and into the outdoors with the students,” said Samuel.

He “whole-heartedly” recommends the Askari Wilderness Conservation Programme, adding that the experience, skills and work will make an impact.

Fleming’s Ecosystem Management Technician program is the right fit for Samuel

Samuel discovered Fleming College through a friend, who endorsed Fleming based on its strong reputation as an environmental school. Samuel researched the College and was intrigued by the Ecosystem Management Technician program, which featured a mandatory field placement and opportunity to travel abroad.

To ensure Fleming was the right fit for him, Samuel attended the Spring 2017 Open House event before starting school that fall.

“The Open House gave me the opportunity to get a feeling for the faculty, the school and the environment. I needed to make sure that I was investing a piece of my life to somewhere that was going to invest in me and my future as well,” he explained. “I found having students and faculty present at booths, providing information and experiences in each program and service, were key in my decision to feeling like the program and school was right for me.”

Samuel describes Fleming’s Frost Campus as his “home away from home,” a close-knit, small campus community full of caring people.

“The faculty here at Fleming College go to the ends of the earth for their students and continue to do so. They have made my experience over the past two years unforgettable, but so incredibly valuable,” he said. “This program is full of wonderful, dedicated and passionate students who are like-minded but provide many different perspectives, and that is something truly amazing.”

Samuel will attend Fleming College for an additional year to complete the Ecosystem Management Technology program. After that, he would like to pursue Fleming’s Environmental Visual Communication graduate certificate at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. He eventually wants to study conservation and biology in university.

Forestry Technician graduate Eric Butson will represent Frost Campus as a Grad Recruiter

ericForestry Technician graduate Eric Butson is looking forward to representing Frost Campus when he travels across Ontario this fall. Eric is a Grad Recruiter for Student Recruitment and will be sharing information about Fleming College with prospective students.

“What I’m looking forward to most as a Grad Recruiter is the opportunity to help secondary school students realize their potential and share with them the opportunities to grasp that potential at Fleming,” said Eric, who graduated from the School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences this year.

Eric said he learned to embrace his weaknesses and face his fears head-on while at Fleming, which he said is the best way to grow personally and professionally.

To clear his mind, Eric said he loves visiting the Loggersports practice site, which is his favourite spot on campus. “It is a place where I spent many nights working hard to perfect my events, clearing my head and escaping the grind of academics for a little while,” he explained.

In addition to Loggersports and his studies in the Forestry Technician program, Eric also worked as a Student Ambassador for Student Recruitment, giving campus tours to prospective students, welcoming guests at Fleming’s Open House, and more.

“Getting to show individuals that are interested in your college what makes it so special to you hardly seemed like work,” he said. “As a Grad Recruiter, I get to hold a similar position and connect with so many more prospective students on a different platform.”

So what makes Fleming so special for Eric? The campus culture.

“My faculty and peers truly wanted everyone to succeed and it was a refreshing experience,” he said. “When speaking with prospective students, the reason I believe they should come to Fleming is because it is a unique college that blends excellence in academics with a student life experience for all individuals.”

Ontario Envirothon: Creating Environmental Leaders of Tomorrow

By: Laura Copeland

Allison Hands, Education Manager at Forests Ontario
Allison Hands, Education Manager at Forests Ontario

The Ontario Envirothon, held each spring, provides a unique opportunity for high school students to engage with the natural world, to learn how resources are managed, and to learn about the various careers and education pathways within the field.

“Regardless of the career path students choose after Envirothon, they will have a deeper understanding and appreciation for natural systems, and will be better able to make informed decisions about the environment,” says Allison Hands, Education Manager at Forests Ontario.

Forests Ontario has coordinated Ontario’s Envirothon program for close to 25 years, and the organization works with regional partners and sponsors – including Fleming College – to host local Envirothon workshops and competitions.

In fact, Rob Monico, with Fleming’s Office of Sustainability, participated in the Wellington-Waterloo Regional Envirothon Competition when he was in high school.

“The workshop and competition days inspired me to keep learning as much as I could about environmental issues. More importantly, I felt inspired and empowered enough to know that I could make a difference in environmental issues,” he says.

Rob’s participation in the event has come full circle. In April, he helped organize the regional Peterborough-Kawarthas-Northumberland Envirothon, which was hosted at Fleming’s Sutherland Campus. He also attended the Ontario Envirothon as a judge in May.

The Peterborough-Kawarthas-Northumberland Envirothon was a new regional competition initiated in 2017 for high schools in the area – there was no competition prior to this. A number of local organizations have worked together to launch and support this regional competition. These include Sustainable Peterborough, the County of Peterborough, Otonabee Region Conservation Authority, local school boards, and Fleming College.

envirothon-friendsThe 2018 regional competitions had 140 teams competing in total, with more than 1,000 students, teachers and volunteers participating across Envirothon events in Ontario. Winning teams from each region go on to compete at the Ontario Envirothon, which was held in Waterloo and featured 21 teams made up of 126 students and teachers.

Fleming College has hosted the Ontario Envirothon event several times at Frost Campus, and was also the co-host of the North American Envirothon championships with Trent University in 2016.

“This is an event we support because Fleming College believes in creating the next generation of environmental leaders. And, more importantly, assisting those leaders today to grow through experiential education opportunities,” says Rob.

“We have faculty, staff and students supporting this event from a variety of program areas,” adds Trish O’Connor, Director of Fleming’s Office of Sustainability. “It is also a great opportunity to showcase the wonderful natural environments at Fleming College to high school students, teachers, and the community.”

Rob explains that students take away a variety of skills by participating in the event. During the workshops and competition, students use different types of field equipment such as tree calipers, soil triangles, and dichotomous keys. Five major topics are covered – forestry, soils, aquatics, wildlife, and a fifth topic that changes every year. (This year it was climate change.)

“Teams also have to synthesize information into a coherent, timed presentation. Through this portion of the program, students develop their critical thinking, teamwork, problem solving and public speaking skills,” says Allison.

For Forests Ontario, Envirothon is a natural fit. The organization’s three pillars are tree planting, community engagement and awareness, and forest education.

“We champion Envirothon because it’s Ontario’s largest environmental competition, it promotes forest education, and it’s a really enriching experience for the students who take part,” says Allison. “We believe this competition helps to create future ‘Green Leaders.’”

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Forests Ontario works with a number of partners and sponsors to deliver Envirothon. Regionally, it works with conservation authorities, post-secondary institutions, professional/industry organizations, government, and charities/non-profits. The organization also offers additional education programs, including the 50 Million Tree Program, Forestry in the Classroom, and TD Tree Bee. For more information, visit: forestsontario.ca

For more information about Fleming College’s School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, visit: flemingcollege.ca/SENRS