Colleges applaud throne speech commitment to higher postsecondary enrolment

Ontario colleges were pleased to see the provincial government’s throne speech stress the need to improve postsecondary participation rates, Fleming President Dr. Tony Tilly said today.“The speech clearly identified that greater numbers of young people need to pursue further education and training after high school,” Dr. Tilly said. “There is recognition that college education and training helps people to fulfil their potential and make a meaningful contribution to the workforce.“We will be looking to work with the government on strategies to increase college enrolment and produce greater numbers of college graduates,” Dr. Tilly added.The need for “a better educated, more highly skilled Ontario” was one of the central themes in the speech from the throne, delivered Thursday by Lt.-Gov. David Onley.“When we improve the quality of public education, when we provide our young people in particular with the skills they need to succeed, we get the best workers, who land the best jobs, who in turn build the strongest economy, which funds everything we want to do together,” Onley said.The throne speech reiterated the McGuinty government’s campaign commitments to deliver a new textbook grant for university and college students and to introduce a special distance grant for students from the North and remote areas who must commute long distances.The speech also emphasized Ontario needs a plan for the economy, and that providing opportunities for everyone will be a key part of the government’s strategy to tackle poverty.Ontario colleges will play a central part in these initiatives. Colleges continue to be accessible to people in lower-income families. In 2007, almost 50 per cent of college applicants reported having household incomes of under $30,000.Colleges will also be central to the province’s overall economic plan. A number of sectors are already struggling to find skilled workers, and the skills shortage will soon escalate. Even with strong immigration levels, Ontario is expected to be short more than 360,000 skilled employees by 2025, and more than 560,000 skilled employees by 2030.Providing greater numbers of people with college education and training will help Ontario to produce the skilled workforce that is essential to our prosperity, Dr. Tilly said.“The government is right when it says that all people must have the opportunity to make a meaningful contribution,” Dr. Tilly said. “We look forward to working with government to ensure this happens.”

Major study explores why young people don’t pursue higher learning

Ontario’s 24 colleges have commissioned the most comprehensive research study ever conducted into the attitudes of high school students who won’t be pursuing any postsecondary education after high school.“This study will help us better understand why young people may be opting out of postsecondary education and not fulfilling their potential,” said Dr. Tony Tilly, President of Fleming College. “At a time when 70 per cent of all new jobs require a college or university credential, one-third of Ontarians between the ages of 25 and 34 have only a high school diploma or less. The study will help Ontario determine what to do to meet this challenge.”This first of its kind study, commissioned by Colleges Ontario, is being conducted by Alan King and Wendy Warren of Queen’s University’s Social Program Evaluation Group (SPEG). The initial phase of the $250,000 study is scheduled to be completed next fall.The study will examine why secondary school students do not proceed to postsecondary education and will consider a broad range of variables including demographic considerations, education and geography.The study will include interviews with respondents to obtain information which will help clarify, elaborate on, and gain insight on issues arising from previous studies and the statistical analyses. Colleges Ontario will use the results to develop proposals to increase postsecondary attainment rates in the province.It is essential that greater numbers of people attain postsecondary education and training, said Dr. Tilly. Currently, there is a need to provide more training and retraining to people who have lost their jobs in the changing economy, particularly in sectors such as manufacturing and forestry.It will also be essential that every person has the education and training to make a meaningful contribution in the workplace as the province is on the verge of a major skills shortage, said Dr. Tilly. If current trends continue, Ontario will have a shortage of 360,000 skilled employees by 2025, affecting much of the province’s economy.Colleges Ontario’s funding partners for the study include the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation, the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario, and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.“This research will help us develop strategies to produce more highly skilled workers and create opportunities for every Ontarian to succeed,” Dr. Tilly said. “Increasing postsecondary education participation rates is also vital to Ontario’s economic success.”King and Warren are leading experts in Ontario on issues involving high school students and their perceptions of postsecondary education. Their past work has included an extensive study of the double cohort in Ontario following the restructuring of the province’s secondary school curriculum.Colleges Ontario is the voice of Ontario’s 24 colleges of applied arts and technology. Ontario colleges serve about 200 communities throughout the province, delivering a wide range of career-focused education and training programs to more than 200,000 full-time and 250,000 part-time students. 

Major study explores why young people don’t pursue higher learning

Ontario’s 24 colleges have commissioned the most comprehensive research study ever conducted into the attitudes of high school students who won’t be pursuing any postsecondary education after high school.“This study will help us better understand why young people may be opting out of postsecondary education and not fulfilling their potential,” said Dr. Tony Tilly, President of Fleming College. “At a time when 70 per cent of all new jobs require a college or university credential, one-third of Ontarians between the ages of 25 and 34 have only a high school diploma or less. The study will help Ontario determine what to do to meet this challenge.”This first of its kind study, commissioned by Colleges Ontario, is being conducted by Alan King and Wendy Warren of Queen’s University’s Social Program Evaluation Group (SPEG). The initial phase of the $250,000 study is scheduled to be completed next fall.The study will examine why secondary school students do not proceed to postsecondary education and will consider a broad range of variables including demographic considerations, education and geography.The study will include interviews with respondents to obtain information which will help clarify, elaborate on, and gain insight on issues arising from previous studies and the statistical analyses. Colleges Ontario will use the results to develop proposals to increase postsecondary attainment rates in the province.It is essential that greater numbers of people attain postsecondary education and training, said Dr. Tilly. Currently, there is a need to provide more training and retraining to people who have lost their jobs in the changing economy, particularly in sectors such as manufacturing and forestry.It will also be essential that every person has the education and training to make a meaningful contribution in the workplace as the province is on the verge of a major skills shortage, said Dr. Tilly. If current trends continue, Ontario will have a shortage of 360,000 skilled employees by 2025, affecting much of the province’s economy.Colleges Ontario’s funding partners for the study include the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation, the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario, and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.“This research will help us develop strategies to produce more highly skilled workers and create opportunities for every Ontarian to succeed,” Dr. Tilly said. “Increasing postsecondary education participation rates is also vital to Ontario’s economic success.”King and Warren are leading experts in Ontario on issues involving high school students and their perceptions of postsecondary education. Their past work has included an extensive study of the double cohort in Ontario following the restructuring of the province’s secondary school curriculum.Colleges Ontario is the voice of Ontario’s 24 colleges of applied arts and technology. Ontario colleges serve about 200 communities throughout the province, delivering a wide range of career-focused education and training programs to more than 200,000 full-time and 250,000 part-time students. 

Trends in early learning: an evening with Diane Kashin

Fleming College, the Four County Conference Committee and Community Living Kawartha Lakes invite you to an evening with Diane Kashin to discuss current trends in the field of early childhood education.“Emerging Trends in Early Learning and Care” will take place on Thursday, December 6 at 7 p.m. in room 374 at the Sutherland Campus of Fleming College, 599 Brealey Dr. in Peterborough. This is a free event, open to the public.Diane Kashin is a faculty member at Seneca College in Toronto. In 2007 she successfully defended her doctoral dissertation: “Reaching the Top of the Mountain: The Impact of Emergent Curriculum on The Practice and Self-Image of Early Childhood Educators”. Ms. Kashin is currently representing the Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario as part of the Member Council of the Canadian Child Care Federation.In addition to Ms. Kashin’s talk, there will be a panel discussion with local experts from the communities of Peterborough and City of Kawartha Lakes. This discussion will address the trends relating to culture and diversity, children with challenges, local trends and the training needs of educators.Participants in this discussion will be Julie Dotsch of Diversity, Alex Crainfield from Five Counties Children’s Centre, Steve Burke of Community Living Kawartha Lakes, Lorrie Baird of Kawartha Child Care Services, Joyce Hawthorne from the City of Peterborough, Janine Mitchell from the City of Kawartha Lakes, and Norma Curtis and Michelle Erridge of Professional Training Requirements.

Grade 7 and 8 students geocaching at Frost Campus

Grade 7 and 8 students will visit Fleming College’s Frost Campus to take part in a series of geocaching competitions, which provide experiential learning opportunities in the environmental and natural resource sciences.The 145 students from Ridgewood Public School in Coboconk and Millbrook Cavan Public School will visit Frost Campus in three separate groups on Thursday, November 22, Thursday, November 29 and Thursday, December 6. The geocaching competitions will start at 10 a.m. on each of those days.The students, working in teams of five, will start from the Frost Campus Biocommons and visit five geocaching sites on campus. The students must collect samples and participate in activities at each site to complete the competition.Geocaching is an outdoor treasure-hunting game in which the participants use a Global Positioning System receiver or other navigational techniques to find hidden containers called geocaches.

"Souper Bowl" for United Way at Cobourg Campus

Fleming College’s Cobourg Campus will once again host its annual “Souper Bowl” fundraiser for the Northumberland United Way.The Souper Bowl will take place on Wednesday, November 21 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. All are welcome to visit the campus and try some delicious soups and chilis made by college staff and students. There will be at least 20 soups and chilis to choose from.Lunch includes a bowl of soup or chili, a fresh baked roll and a bottle of water – come early for the best selection. There will also be live entertainment for visitors. Tickets are $7 and are available in advance or at the door at the Cobourg Campus, 1005 Elgin St. W. in Cobourg. The Souper Bowl will include a bake sale with proceeds also going to the United Way.Last year’s event raised more than $800. This year’s goal is to raise $1,000. Organizers would like to thank the event’s corporate sponsors Dutch Oven Food Services Ltd. and Chartwells.

Fleming College recognized for muskellunge restoration efforts

Fleming College recognized for muskellunge restoration efforts

The Midhurst District Office of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) recently recognized Fleming College faculty and staff, who are working in partnership with the MNR and other conservation organizations to restore muskellunge to Lake Simcoe.Fleming College Fisheries Technician and Instructor Sasha Fernando and Environmental Technology student and muskellunge restoration volunteer Kevin Mcgilloway, accepted an appreciation award on behalf of the Fleming faculty, staff, students and volunteers involved in the Lake Simcoe Muskellunge Restoration Project, at a dinner in Collingwood on Thursday, November 1.The MNR hosted the event to recognize the many organizations it works with in the restoration and conservation of natural resources. Fleming College has partnered with the MNR and Muskies Canada Inc. to rear muskellunge at the Frost Campus Fish Hatchery and then stock the fish in Lake Simcoe. Muskies Canada also received an appreciation award from the MNR at the event.Mr. Fernando said the MNR recognizes the importance of partnering with conservation organizations and educational institutions to ensure sound resource management. “Conservation, rehabilitation, and management of our resources are a collective effort. We have vast and under-appreciated natural resources in Ontario and across Canada. In regard to environmental issues, there are too many issues and too many user groups surrounding the natural resources for them to be managed from one point of view,” said Mr. Fernando.Muskellunge are native to Lake Simcoe but overharvest, habitat loss and ecological change have led to their demise. As part of their field experience, second and third year students in the Fish and Wildlife program participated in stocking the fish throughout October and November. 

“Souper Bowl” for United Way at Cobourg Campus

Fleming College’s Cobourg Campus will once again host its annual “Souper Bowl” fundraiser for the Northumberland United Way.The Souper Bowl will take place on Wednesday, November 21 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. All are welcome to visit the campus and try some delicious soups and chilis made by college staff and students. There will be at least 20 soups and chilis to choose from.Lunch includes a bowl of soup or chili, a fresh baked roll and a bottle of water – come early for the best selection. There will also be live entertainment for visitors. Tickets are $7 and are available in advance or at the door at the Cobourg Campus, 1005 Elgin St. W. in Cobourg. The Souper Bowl will include a bake sale with proceeds also going to the United Way.Last year’s event raised more than $800. This year’s goal is to raise $1,000. Organizers would like to thank the event’s corporate sponsors Dutch Oven Food Services Ltd. and Chartwells.

Fleming College participates in Muskellunge Restoration Project

Fleming College is partnering with Muskies Canada Inc. and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources on a project to restore muskellunge to Lake Simcoe.Guided by Fish and Wildlife Program Coordinator Al Chamberlain and supervised by Fisheries Technician and Instructor Sasha Fernando, the project at the Frost Campus Fish Hatchery initially expected to rear between 200 and 500 muskellunge from their green egg life stage to fall fingerlings. However, the project has already succeeded in stocking out more than 1,000 fall fingerling muskellunge averaging seven to 10 inches in length with more to be stocked out later this fall.“The Fleming College muskellunge research facility has been so successful due to a committed team of faculty, staff, student workers and volunteer help. Anytime you deal with raising live animals it becomes a 24-hour a day job. Attention to detail and following a strict regime of daily fish culture practices have contributed to our success,” says Mr. Fernando.Following strict rearing protocols, applying the methods of a previously successful reintroduction, and excellent support from the staff at Frost Campus all played a role in exceeding the project’s goals, added Mr. ChamberlainThe college raised the fall fingerlings in support of the Lake Simcoe Muskellunge Restoration Project. Muskellunge are native to Lake Simcoe but overharvest, habitat loss and ecological change led to their demise, says Mr. Fernando. As part of their field experience, second and third year students in the Fish and Wildlife program will participate in stocking the fish throughout October and November.In Canada, the range of the muskellunge extends throughout the St. Lawrence River and all of the Great Lakes, to many inland waters of Ontario and Quebec. Its preferred habitat is warm, vegetated lakes, bays, and slow-flowing rivers. The muskellunge is a predatory species whose main food source is other fish.Muskies Canada Sport Fishing and Research Incorporated or Muskies Canada Inc. was founded in 1978. It is an angling club whose interests extend beyond the mere catching of fish and whose goals include the protection and enhancement of the sport fishery for muskellunge in Canada through the wise use of the muskellunge resource, research, habitat protection and improvement, and scientific studies of the species. For more information on the Muskellunge Restoration Project and other Muskies Canada programs, visit www.muskiescanada.caThe Frost Campus Fish Hatchery is also home to the Lake Ontario Atlantic Salmon Restoration Project, now in its second year. The hatchery has been successful in raising Atlantic salmon for release into designated watersheds such as the Cobourg Creek and Credit River for the eventual restoration of Atlantic salmon to Lake Ontario. 

University Transfer students prepare for Trent

University Transfer students prepare for Trent

Students in Fleming College’s General Arts and Science – University Transfer program got a taste of university life recently when they toured the Trent University campus and heard firsthand from graduates of the program.Ten alumni attended a lunch at Trent’s Lady Eaton College to share their university experiences with the Fleming students. The General Arts and Science – University Transfer, an Ontario College Certificate program, is now in its third year of existence with 85 students currently enrolled and another 35 graduates at Trent.In a unique agreement between Fleming and Trent, the University Transfer program allows students to complete the one-year program at Fleming and then transfer into second year at Trent. Students at Fleming take four first-year university-level credits in English, Psychology, Sociology and Philosophy.Students also take additional courses, including Language Composition and Critically Aware Thinking, which helps them transition more smoothly into university. Students must achieve an overall average of 70 per cent and 65 per cent or better in the four transfer credit courses to be considered for admission into Trent.Karen Maki, Assistant to the Associate Dean of Julian Blackburn College and Manager of Continuing Education at Trent, says she sits on a number of provincial education committees, “and they are talking about this program.”“You really are pioneers,” she told the students. “People across the province are talking about this program and what’s going on here. We’re really grateful and proud of the program.”In offering advice about university life the University Transfer graduates praised the unique program and its faculty.“It prepared me well,” said Fleming alumnus and second-year Trent student Tim Lizotte. “I found the (transition) to academic work at Trent very seamless and the Fleming courses helped conceptualize the rigorous courses and high workload here at Trent.”Mr. Lizotte is majoring in English and Geography and plans to go on to teachers college. Other graduates have gone on to major in Sociology, Women’s Studies, Anthropology and English.“This is the first time all three years of the program have been together and it’s the only program like this in the college system,” said Peter Lapp, Coordinator of the General Arts and Science – University Transfer program at Fleming. “This has been a collective effort between Fleming and Trent. There’s a sense that we’ve all embarked on this together.”