School of Health and Wellness Students are well-prepared

School of Health and Wellness Students are well-prepared

Within the health care field in Canada, to certify individuals to practice, most professions require written and/or practical exams in addition to diplomas and degrees. These exams are highly regulated on a provincial or national level.Fleming graduates’ stellar performance on these certification exams further illustrates and reinforces the excellent reputation of the college’s programs within the School of Health and Wellness.Within Fleming’s Massage Therapy program, 92 per cent of its graduates passed the practical component of the certification exam, compared to a provincial pass rate of 77 per cent. On the theory section of the exam, 90 per cent of Fleming graduates succeeded compared to a provincial pass rate of 84 per cent.

School of Community Development & Health

The school of Community Development offers a unique mixture of practical hands-on learning and theory. An important component of learning takes place in field practicums which gives the students the chance to work in the community, throughout the province, in Canada and even internationally. Many of our graduates find employment as a result of their placement, and may even be offered a job prior to graduation. The faculty are well- recognized in their respective fields, sharing their expertise and  bringing bring real world experiences to the classroom.

Fleming Student 5th at Skills Competition

Fleming Student 5th at Skills Competition

Fleming College Culinary Management student Amanda Moss cooked up a fifth place finish at the Skills Canada Competition in Halifax, held May 21 to 26.To place in the top five in the country is an amazing feat. Chef/Professor Steve Benns, Amanda’s advisor from Fleming College, commented that: "Amanda worked extremely hard to prepare herself for this competition, all while balancing a part time job, school, and family life." "She was the most professional student in the competition." He added that, "this experience will definitely help Amanda prepare for her bright future in the culinary industry."Each year Skills Canada-Ontario coordinates the Ontario Technological Skills Competition. The competition was held at RIM Park and Manulife Financial Sportsplex in Waterloo, Ontario from May 1 to 3, 2006.  It was a three-day event in which students from across the province have the opportunity to showcase their talents and test themselves against industry standards. The purpose of the contest is to evaluate each contestant’s preparation for employment in the food service industry and to recognize outstanding students for excellence and professionalism in culinary arts.Amanda, a fourth-semester Culinary Management student, competed in the Culinary Arts Postsecondary competition. She had to prepare a platter presentation for four people of a salmon entrée and a dessert. The contest was judged by leading industry chefs and they based their final marks on safety and sanitation, limiting waste, using proper preparation techniques, professional use of tools, appetizing and modern presentation, balanced taste and seasonings, following the set items on the menu, and a five minute interview.Amanda achieved gold medal status over 15 other competitors from across Ontario and qualified to represent Ontario in the Skills Canada competition. Amanda competed against 11 other provinces in the two-day competition, garnering her fifth place finish.

Bring Back the Salmon

Bring Back the Salmon

Fleming College will be a major partner in a five-year project, Bring Back the Salmon, which will help restore native Atlantic salmon to Lake Ontario. The Frost Campus will rear Atlantic salmon at its hatchery. Students also will benefit from applied learning opportunities through field work on the project. Students in the Fish and Wildlife program at Frost have already participated in the first release of the salmon into Cobourg Creek on Tuesday, May 16 and Wednesday, May 17.Sporting hip waders, students were given green watering cans filled with water and about 500 fry. They then waded out into the creek and carefully poured the fry through the spout out into the water. "We’re excited at the prospect of playing a significant role in a large-scale restoration project that links so closely with our educational endeavours," said Blane Harvey, Frost Campus Principal. "Faculty and students from our Fish and Wildlife program will make a significant contribution to the successful implementation of this ambitious restoration program." "The Fleming College Fish Hatchery received a pilot intake of several thousand Atlantic salmon eggs and fry last December, from the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR). With these, we have been developing student learning activities, as well as new hatchery systems, in preparation for our intake of 100,000 Atlantic salmon eggs in December 2006," said Chris Westcott, Fleming College Fish and Wildlife Technologist.The Atlantic salmon restoration program wa s announced Thursday, April 27 at an event on the shores of Lake Ontario in Toronto. The LCBO and Banrock Station Wines will fund the program with a pledge to contribute $1.625 million over five years.The Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters (OFAH) will oversee the program with additional assistance from the MNR and a number of conservation groups.This restoration initiative comes almost 110 years after Lake Ontario’s Atlantic salmon – Ontario’s original salmon – were declared extirpated from our waters. Restoration of Lake Ontario’s Atlantic salmon is considered the most significant freshwater restoration project in North America.

Success in Customs Administration

Success in Customs Administration
Andrea HielemaCustoms AdministrationClass of 2004 Customs Co-ordinator for Wal-Mart Canada

" I have been here for a year and I’m enjoying every minute of it," says Andrea of her position at Wal-Mart Canada’s headquarters in Mississauga. "Not only am I working for the largest retailer in Canada, but I also have a job in which I can really grow and expand my knowledge of customs."I believe that my confidence is directly related to the Customs Administration program at Fleming College. The program gave me the foundation and knowledge to work through any situation that comes up. My teachers were wonderful and really knew their stuff. They were also very supportive and truly cared about their students," Andrea says. "I don’t think any other college can live up to the Customs Administration program at Fleming College – without it I would not be where I am today."

School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences

School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences
A Living Wall that naturally filters indoor air and provides an interior green space has been installed at the Frost Campus of Fleming College.

Our school is different. There’s no other way to explain it. You’ll get to know other students and faculty by name – from day one. Since our focus is the environment, nature is your classroom. You won’t spend much time pushing a pencil in a lecture hall. You’re more likely to measure a tree, climb one, or study the wildlife that makes the tree their habitat. We are recognized as one of Canada’s leading schools for careers in environmental and natural resource sciences.Active, outdoor, hands-on learningField trips, field schools and applied projectsFaculty who are experts in their fieldsExclusive programs to prepare you for careers in the fast growing environmental sectorMore grads working in these fields than any other college in Canada = strong network for employment opportunities"I decided to attend Fleming College because of this School's incredible reputation. I chose the Ecosystem Management program because of its social approach to the environment – that appeals to me. We look at how we humans fit into the ecosystem and how the ecosystem functions as a whole.  The professors are really interested in what they're teaching and go beyond the requirements – like today, we learned that lichens can eat paint off bridges. Wow! I'm gaining a real sense of  interconnectedness and respect for the environment. The program has exceeded my expectations."Emma KempeSecond year student in Ecosystem ManagementWinner of the prestigious 2006 Garfield Weston Merit Scholarship

Living Wall Installed at Frost Campus

Living Wall Installed at Frost Campus

Lindsay ON – A Living Wall that naturally filters indoor air and provides an interior green space has been installed at the Frost Campus of Fleming College."The Living Wall will provide a platform to study new ideas for indoor bioremediation techniques, driven by desires for a more sustainable approach," says Ashleigh Uiska, Frost Sustainability Coordinator .The Living Wall is made up of plants that host microorganisms, which break down toxins often found in indoor air. The plants also condition the air by increasing oxygen levels. Aquaria will also be integrated into the Living Wall. The aquaria will act as the reservoirs and be home to several indigenous fish species that will produce nutrients to supply the plant life in the wall.  Apart from the physiological aspects of the system, the psychological benefits of providing a welcoming space for staff and students to lounge, relax and enjoy the waterfalls, plants and animals indoors were considered in the design.Students from various programs within the School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences will be actively involved in: * monitoring the air and water qualities * studying the integrated plants and animals  * learning about the system's operation * maintenance of the ecosystem."Implementing new technologies and areas of study at the college is not only a benefit to the students, but increases the overall knowledge base of our entire community," says Blane Harvey, Principal of the Frost Campus The Living Wall uses lava rock as the substrate, and employs a continuous-flow hydroponic system. Roots will dip into the aerated water and are continuously exposed to nutrients. The plants are placed between the dry-stacked lava rock wall, which supports them, and can be easily rearranged for optimal results. The water flows behind the rocks, forcing air through the system. Air flows by natural convection, with the air current amplified by the rushing waterfall.Evaporization is minimized by decreasing the temperature differential between the air and water.  Splash is also lessened by directing the water flow down the flat plane, lightly trickling over the lava rock. The elimination of fans reduces the energy input into the system.Located in the heart of Central Ontario, Fleming College has campuses in Peterborough, Lindsay, Cobourg and Haliburton. Named for famous Canadian inventor and engineer Sir Sandford Fleming, the college features more than 90 full-time programs in Law and Justice, Community Development, Health and Wellness, Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Technology and Skilled Trades, Fine Arts, and Business. Fleming College has 5,000 full-time and 10,000 part-time students and more than 50,000 alumni.

Dan Carrocci – Premier’s Award Nominee

Dan Carrocci - Premier’s Award Nominee
Dan CarrocciPremier’s Award NomineeDual Diploma Graduate of Resources Drilling & Blasting and Geological Technician programs School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences

Dan, a dual diploma graduate of Resources Drilling and Blasting and Geological Technician programs at the School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences is one of seven Fleming College Fleming College grads nominated for the prestigious 2006 Premier's Awards. Chosen from nominations submitted by Ontario's 24 colleges, nominees must demonstrate career success related to their college experience and must have made a significant contribution to their community. Dan is a youthful entrepreneur and Owner/Operator of Determination Drilling & Soil Investigations based in Hamilton. He credits his success to his education at the School and encourages others who might be interested in self-employment to “Go for it!” “I do both geotechnical and environmental assessments and everything that I learned at college goes hand in hand. The environmental industry is huge – the more skills you have, the more doros you open. Choosing Fleming College was definitely a good decision for me. It gave me a great network too – 80% of my clients are Fleming grads.”

Fleming Grad Travels Abroad

Fleming Grad Travels Abroad

Fleming graduate Jason McCrindle always knew he wanted to visit Australia. When it came time for the placement portion of the Recreation and Leisure Services program, he seized the opportunity to travel abroad.  McCrindle completed his placement, from February to May this year at Simply Skydive, a skydiving business located near Sydney, Australia. During his placement he was involved in aspects of marketing, advertising and promotion of the business.Prior to his placement, McCrindle had never been skydiving. To be able to work at Simply Skydive, he had to obtain his Australia Federation Sky Diving Certification, which allows him to jump solo anywhere in the world. Now that’s he’s certified and an experienced skydiver, McCrindle says it’s one of the best things he’s ever done. Mr. McCrindle has not stopped pursuing his goals now that he’s working full-time. He would like to return to Canada when Simply Skydive opens a drop zone in British Columbia in 2008.

Centre for Alternative Wastewater Treatment to participate in International Polar Year research

Fleming College’s Centre for Alternative Wastewater Treatment (CAWT) has been selected to participate in the International Polar Year (IPY), making it the only college in Southern Canada chosen to conduct a research project as part of IPY.The International Polar Year marks the largest-ever international program of scientific research focused on the Arctic and Antarctic regions. Thousands of scientists and researchers from more than 60 nations around the globe are expected to participate in IPY during the 24-month period beginning in March 2007. Canada has selected 44 science and research projects, which were officially announced by Indian Affairs and Northern Development Minister Jim Prentice in Ottawa on March 1.Under the leadership of CAWT Manager Dr. Brent Wootton, the project’s Principal Investigator Professor Mark Williamson and associated scientific and technical project personnel at Fleming College’s Frost Campus will develop constructed wetlands for the treatment of wastewater in Arctic communities.Constructed wetland systems for wastewater treatment are an example of a sustainable, environmentally progressive technology that is in its infancy in Polar regions. This project will develop new engineering and technology solutions to assist Northern residents to adapt to changing settlement patterns and the associated wastewater treatment health issues that arise.Several pilot-scale constructed wetland systems will be developed at the CAWT at Fleming College. The research activities at the centre will focus on arriving at a prototype design specific to arctic needs. Pilot scale systems to test these designs will then be built in communities in the Canadian Arctic while involving communities, scientists, local groups and individuals. These pilot systems will be monitored locally and publicized, encouraging community stewardship of water resources and further initiatives. For more information on the CAWT, visit www.flemingcollege.com/cawtLocated in the heart of Central Ontario, Fleming College has campuses in Peterborough, Lindsay, Cobourg and Haliburton. Named for famous Canadian inventor and engineer Sir Sandford Fleming, the college features more than 90 full-time programs in Law and Justice, Community Development, Health and Wellness, Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Technology and Skilled Trades, Fine Arts, and Business. Fleming College has 5,000 full-time and 10,000 part-time students and more than 50,000 alumni.