Urban Forestry Technician Co-op Curriculum

School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences

Accepting Applications for September 2018

Credential: Ontario College Diploma ( 5 semesters )
Classes begin:
September 04, 2018
Offered at:
Frost Campus
Program code:
UFT
Tuition & Ancillary Fees:
Domestic:
$2,145.38 per semester*
International:
$7,793.45 per semester*
* Tuition and fees subject to change.

Courses and Descriptions

Semester 1

FSTY 7
Units/ Hours: 60

This course deals with the identification of approximately 125 trees and shrubs found in urban settings in Ontario. Tree features including leaves, twigs, bark and fruits are studied. The accuracy level for the identification tests is 80 per cent. The lecture series includes: the anatomy and physiology of leaves, stems, roots and flowers, fruit adaptations for seed dispersal and forest geography. The cultural requirements of the major urban tree species are studied.

FSTY 11
Units/ Hours: 45

Students of the Forestry, Arboriculture and Urban Forestry Certificate/Technician programs possess an excellent foundation in the 'normal growth' of trees. This course introduces students to the study of insects and diseases of forest and urban trees. Identification, classification, and control measures of commercially important insects, pathogens and diseases are examined. The emphasis is on the pests of forest and urban trees and a collection of such specimens.

MECH 45
Units/ Hours: 90

Students are instructed in the safe operation and maintenance of equipment associated with the arboriculture and utility industries. Chainsaw operation and tree felling techniques are competency-based standards set out by the Professional Chainsaw Operation guidelines by Workplace Safety North. The techniques introduced in this course are transferable to other courses within the program. Students will be required to purchase items of personal protective equipment (safety glasses, safety boots, chainsaw pants, safety gloves, hard hat, and hearing protection) as recommended, before the course begins.

FSTY 99
Units/ Hours: 90

Tree health management focuses on a thoughtful, holistic approach to successfully incorporating trees into the urban environment. Learning proper planning, planting and establishment strategies, students will focus on prevention of tree health problems. Students will develop the ability to diagnose damaging agents and prescribe required control or management measures using Integrated Pest Management and other industry mitigation techniques to maintain and establish healthy urban ecosystems. The economic and social impacts of trees in the landscape will also be examined to aid in decision making processes.

Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.

Semester 2

MATH 63
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will enable students to apply specific mathematical concepts and acquire foundation skills important in the Natural Resource and Environmental Sciences. It is designed to complement and reinforce learning within other first semester courses and program areas.

APST 154
Units/ Hours: 21

This 7 week course is designed to equip students with the skills needed for their work search and to develop and enhance career planning skills. Students will learn how to write competitive job search documents, interview with confidence, and will develop and use their career portfolio as a tool to identify and incorporate career goals into the job search process.

FSTY 82
Units/ Hours: 60

For many decades cities have been designed and constructed to support greyscapes. It is only in recent years that the spotlight has turned to the importance and the value of urban greenspaces. No living plant has greater struggles within the built environment than trees. Limitation of space and resources due to turf, soil compaction and concrete, challenge a tree's ability to thrive, yet they are absolutely essential to any urban area. Greenspace Management explores ways in which trees can be incorporated into developed spaces successfully. Students will also learn to plan for trees in new infrastructure, focusing on the essential requirements needed to reach maturity. This course builds on existing knowledge of tree culture and maintenance while integrating it with challenges presented in the urban environment. Students will learn effective practices that enhance the quality and longevity of trees and green spaces. Topics include elements needed for growth, spatial requirements and soil composition. Using knowledge gained in first and second semesters, students will begin work on preliminary phases of a program-long Urban Forest Management Plan.

GEOL 39
Units/ Hours: 45

This course examines the basic concepts of glaciation and resultant landforms. Field trips examine the main physiographic units found in Southern Ontario. The course also focuses on basic geomorphology concepts pertaining to weathering, mass movement, erosion, stream and valley development and coastal processes which have occurred since deglaciation. The course is intended to give students a basic knowledge of the impact glaciation and modern surficial processes have had on our natural environment. Field trips examine the main glacial, fluvioglacial and lacustrine features found in South Central Ontario and encourage hands on participation in sampling data acquisition. Laboratory analyses serve to document the relationships between texture and origin of these features and to emphasize the importance of soils to land development. A major composite term project allows the student to develop and apply participation, organization and writing skills.

FSTY 60
Units/ Hours: 45

This course introduces the students to tree anatomy, tree physiology, urban soil conditions, tree installation and the impact of construction on tree health. Field trips deal with tree selection, tree pruning, tree reaction to wounding and an introduction to hazard tree assessment.

COMP 491
Units/ Hours: 45

This computer course introduces the student to computer basics (computer terminology, e-mail, Internet, file management) and stresses the application and use of presentation, spreadsheet and database software, along with effective use of GPS/GIS technologies. To learn the latest computer techniques used by urban forest professionals, each student will be required to have a device (tablet / smart phone - Android or iPhone) capable of handling 'apps' and associated software. Through the extensive use of hand-on activities directly related to urban forestry, students will gain sufficient knowledge and experience to make productive use of computers/smart phones/tablets in the office or out on the streets of the urban landscape. The fundamental computer skills gained in this course will be applied throughout the remaining semesters.

LAWS 249
Units/ Hours: 45

The student will develop skills in working at the municipal government level to address multiple urban forestry legal issues. Skills will include interpretation and application of municipal tree bylaws, legislation, policies, and tenders and acts.

GNED 107
Units/ Hours: 45

This course introduces theories of conflict and different perspectives used to understand and assess conflict. Various views of conflict, conflict escalation and resolution are studied, utilizing insights from a range of disciplines including psychology, sociology, communications, cultural studies and law. It also introduces the theory and practice of negotiations and explores various models of negotiation and bargaining, highlighting similarities and differences in the models and methods of negotiation. Covers various stages of negotiation, from pre-negotiation to negotiation proper to post-settlement negotiation; and emphasizes the development of skills through the use of role plays to enable the participant to apply theory to cases.

Semester 3

APST 105
Units/ Hours: 450

The mandatory, paid co-op placement is intended to give students experience with real world organizations engaged in urban forestry activities. It provides the student the opportunity to apply existing knowledge and skills obtained in semester one of the program.

Pre-Requisites

Semester 4

MATH 111
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will prepare the student mathematically for study and work in the field of Urban Forestry. The course broadens students' understanding of mathematics as it relates to algebraic and quantitative abilities useful in the study of courses in the urban forestry (degree) program. The student will utilize algebraic techniques necessary for problem-solving and basic linear mathematical modelling. Basic financial calculations as well as concepts of statistical hypothesis testing will be learned to prepare students for further study in Urban Forestry.

Pre-Requisites
FSTY 58
Units/ Hours: 90

Arboriculture Skills and Techniques provides classroom and hands on experience in many aspects of tree work from a ground-person's perspective. The focus is on preparing ground workers with the skills and knowledge to provide safe and efficient support to their crew, through in-depth understanding of the tools, equipment and techniques used for aerial work. Classes will provide opportunities to examine tree operations through team work.

COMM 131
Units/ Hours: 60

Communication is an exciting and rewarding part of any career. Successful professional communication requires an understanding of both individual and organizational audiences and the ability to create effective messages for them. Critical Thinking and Communication will introduce students to the critical-thinking, problem-solving and professional communication and writing skills that are required in order to be successful advocates for ecological restoration, technical writers, and academic researchers and authors. Course content will develop skill in writing lab and field reports, academic essays and managing positive and negative messages. In this course students will learn to "see communication, understand it, and manage it." They will learn to recognise and analyse the rich examples of written and nonverbal communication found in personal and work experiences and in current ecological restoration issues as they appear in both popular and academic media. Students make an important contribution to this course in the study and experience of professional communication.

NATR 7
Units/ Hours: 45

This course provides an introduction to remote sensing and the interpretation of physical, biological and cultural features from remote sensed digital images. The student will have the opportunity to work with traditional remote sensing methods, current techniques and developing technology. By the end of semester the student will acquire a range of skills to analyze and interpret a wide variety of remote sensed data.

FSTY 10
Units/ Hours: 45

This course deals with the natural factors affecting the establishment and growth of trees individually and in communities, and how these factors affect the future development of plant communities according to the principle of succession. The development of plantations and woodlots will be examined from a successional point of view. Students will examine, in detail, the use of site classification systems and soil surveys as tools in silviculture decision making.

NATR 97
Units/ Hours: 45

There are two key areas of trees that must be looked at in order to grow trees successfully. Tree management from the ground up and tree roots and soil below ground. This course will look at the latter of the 2. Students will understand the contrast of natural soils and urban soils. They will learn the challenges trees face growing in urban soils and the importance of maintaining healthy soil in the built environment.

ENVR 109
Units/ Hours: 45

This modular course studies the various components of a watershed (limnology, hydrology, and hydrogeology) and their interactions. Various streamflow monitoring/sampling techniques and their applications to sedimentation and to predictions of flooding will be examined. Attention will be brought to the conflicting demands of use on watersheds and to various remedial options.

Semester 5

BUSN 145
Units/ Hours: 45

The success of any business relies on sound decision making and a thorough understanding of business operations. This course acquaints students with the processes involved in both the establishment and operation of a small business in the resource management and outdoor service sectors from the ground up. Students will explore all facets of a successful business including; operational, legal and administrative aspects.

FSTY 100
Units/ Hours: 45

Applying knowledge acquired in Dendrology I, students will learn the skills to identify any tree or shrub in a temperate climate. Students will be introduced to a variety of forest industry specializations and continue to build on their tree identification skills. Tree physiology will be studied in greater depth, building on the foundation of Dendrology I.

Pre-Requisites
GEOM 112
Units/ Hours: 45

The course provides the urban forestry students skills in data acquisition, data management, and spatial analysis through a series of real-time projects. The course will stress the effective meshing of multiple technologies (GPS, GIS, LIDAR modelling programs) to transfer ?street level? data to comprehensive reports/maps for quality decision making.

MATH 134
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on inference. The major topics include methods of analysing sets of data, probability, probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression and correlation. Course concepts are applied to the natural sciences.

Pre-Requisites
FSTY 83
Units/ Hours: 45

Management of greenspace in the urban environment is essential to maintain the benefits trees provide. This course highlights the importance of being socially and politically connected to people of all ages in local communities and municipalities to address urban forest issues. Students will develop strong interpersonal and communication skills through direct contact, delivering educational sessions to a variety of community groups, schools and members of local municipalities.

FIWI 50
Units/ Hours: 45

This course examines the life history, behaviour and habits of nuisance plant and animal species. Management techniques will include methodology, materials, equipment and strategies used for repelling or removing nuisance species. It will also explore laws and hazards of repelling or removing such species and the risks to humans, plants and animals. This course will also look at ways of working with wildlife and the urban environment so as both co-exist, realizing that urban trees play a vital role in the urban ecosystem.

FSTY 76
Units/ Hours: 45

This course deals with woody plant propagation within greenhouse and bare-root nurseries for both natural and urban landscapes as well as for forest management. This course also addresses preservation and care of horticultural plants for human well-being in urban settings. Topics include tree seed processing, stratification, germination, seedling culture, cutting propagation, nursery soils, fertilizers, irrigation, and quality control. Special emphasis will be placed on plant selection, plant growth and responses, horticultural practices, preventative maintenance, nursery stock handling, plant-to-soil relationships, and overall seedling physiology.

Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.