Museum Management and Curatorship Curriculum

Waitlisted for September 2018

Credential: Ontario College Graduate Certificate ( 3 semesters )
Classes begin:
September 04, 2018
Offered at:
Sutherland Campus
Program code:
ACM
Tuition & Ancillary Fees:
Domestic:
$3,132.83 per semester*
International:
$9,389.63 per semester*
* Tuition and fees subject to change.

Courses and Descriptions

Semester 1

SCIE 33
Units/ Hours: 45

This course introduces essential practices in the maintenance and protection of museum collections. Preventive conservation focuses on establishing a stable and secure environment for collections. The student will learn the agents of deterioration threatening collections and the primary means of control. Students will learn safe handling procedures, condition reporting and how to assess and meet object needs for packing, storage and display.

Co-Requisites
MUSM 4
Units/ Hours: 45

Collections Management I introduces the basic principles of collections and collections records management. It provides an overview of the functions of the registrar and registration department with a special emphasis on the issues surrounding the development and maintenance of an effective records management system. Manual and automated systems will be examined in the context of a general museum collection.

Co-Requisites
MUSM 6
Units/ Hours: 45

Curatorial research is motivated by two things: a love of objects, and a fascination with the ways in which they speak about the past and present. The care of artifacts (i.e., objects within a museum context) cannot stop at identification and physical conservation. Identification must be seen as part of a larger task: an exploration of the social and cultural significance of objects in relation to each other and to the people who made, used, and kept them. Conservation must include preservation of the information accompanying an object, information beyond personal institutional provenance, or artifact type. Finally, curatorial research entails a critical awareness of our own culturally-bound responses to artifacts.This course prepares students for collections research in the museum environment, and for the challenge of developing meaning and value for those collections in a regional context. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the museum research function, and the use of a relatively new approach to historical research - material history. Each 3 hour session integrates presentations, group work and discussion, case studies, and independent research. In addition, the instructor will facilitate visits from guest lecturers.

Co-Requisites
MUSM 59
Units/ Hours: 30

This course provides an introduction to education and interpretation in museums, galleries and historic sites, etc. The course explores policy development, learning theory, learning styles, and communication and interpretive skills. Students will learn how to identify audience characteristics, conduct needs assessment activities, and begin to design an educational or public program in a museum or gallery setting.

MUSM 10
Units/ Hours: 45

This course introduces the role of museum exhibits within both the museum and the community, and develops the skills necessary to manage an exhibition program at a community museum. As part of the first semester of the Museum Management and Curatorship Program, this course will introduce students to different types of exhibits, their purposes, how they are planned, and the complex relationships among a museum, its exhibits, and its audiences. Students will apply their knowledge and develop skills through carrying out a number of real-life exhibition projects for community clients.

Co-Requisites
MUSM 14
Units/ Hours: 45

The course provides a framework for the understanding of the organization and management of the non-for-profit or public sector arts or heritage organization. Using a combination of theory and practice, it develops the basic skills required by the generalist museum worker in order to administer the day-to-day operations of a small to medium sized museum. This course focuses on organizing and leading as key management functions.

MUSM 58
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will focus on the fundamentals of digital imaging needed to create digitized images of collection objects for a variety of purposes, while adhering to professional standards of practice. Learners will also be introduced to the principles of graphic design and the software and hardware used to prepare visual materials for museum and gallery applications. By the end of the course, you will be able to identify basic principles and guidelines for good graphic design, use Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign to modify images, layout text, create graphics, plan and manage digital workflow and use production hardware. The course will also give you the basic vocabulary and experience to knowledgeably manage and or outsource digital imaging and graphic design projects.

Semester 2

MUSM 1
Units/ Hours: 15

Using five half-day workshops (per group), this introduction to archival management is designed to provide the general museum worker with the basic knowledge to implement and manage an archival program as an integral component of museum operations. The course focuses on the selection, appraisal, arrangement, description and management of archival holdings. It also focuses on public access, legal and donor-related restrictions, ethical practises in archives, records management and professional documentation standards.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
SCIE 34
Units/ Hours: 45

The student will learn to recognize the material characteristics, fabrication methods, and deterioration processes of historic objects commonly found in a museum collection eg. paper, paints, metals, wood, textiles, ethnographic material, glass, ceramics. Basic techniques for cleaning, stabilization and support are examined. Emphasis is placed on developing judgement skills and determining personal limitations in order to assess when to seek outside assistance from a conservator. Note: All components of course work must be attempted in order to achieve a passing grade. Students are required to participate in routine housekeeping activities in the Fine Gallery at the museum as necessary. Students will be required to participate in laboratory clean-up as necessary.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
MUSM 5
Units/ Hours: 45

Collections Management II is a continuation of Collections Management I, with a change in emphasis from basic practices and procedures to more complex activities, issues and concerns associated with the ownership, stewardship and management of cultural property. The course examines the legal framework surrounding the management of collections in greater depth including transfer of title, gifting, appraisals, cultural property legislation, and copyright law. As well, it explores collections stewardship within a broader context that includes the needs of specialized objects, collections and communities; managing collection risks, and ensuring long term stability through a process of collections review and refinement. Managing collections effectively also requires responding to increased demands for access through ensuring collections information is accurate, consistent, detailed and available. Throughout the course, relationships with donors, artists, members of the public and special interest groups are considered in the context of changing ideas about the role of museums and galleries. In some cases students will be working on projects and case studies where there are few documented precedents and where primary research will be required.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
MUSM 8
Units/ Hours: 45

In this course, students will learn the methodology of program design while gaining hands-on experience in program planning and implementation using a variety of teaching techniques. Students will develop strategies for promotion, evaluation and statistics records management. The parallels and differences between working in the museum, gallery and historic site contexts will also be examined.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
MUSM 11
Units/ Hours: 75

Exhibition Development II involves the creation of temporary and permanent exhibitions for community museums and interpretative centres, based on planning undertaken during Exhibition Development I, and exhibit research conducted during Curatorial Research Methods. As part of the second semester of the Museum Management and Curatorship program, this course helps students develop the wide range of skills needed to create an exhibition, including project management (planning, scheduling, budgeting, coordination and communication), research, interpretative planning, writing, design, fabrication, installation, marketing and evaluation. Students apply their knowledge in these areas to the creation of one or more exhibitions for community clients. A strong emphasis is placed on teamwork and the development of positive and productive relationships with peers and community partners since these skills and abilities are required to be successful in the field.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
MUSM 15
Units/ Hours: 45

This course focuses on museums as businesses and introduces the key principles of financial management, fundraising and grantsmanship, planning and marketing in the non-profit organization. A special emphasis will be placed on developing a working context for the small to medium sized agency. Where possible local institutions will be used as case studies.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
MUSM 23
Units/ Hours: 30

The internship is a key opportunity to synthesize theory and practice in an approved conservation laboratory, museum or related setting under the direction of an experienced practitioner. In order to plan for an effective placement, students will complete an assessment of personal needs and resources, update resumes, initiate a search and selection process, negotiate and draft a learning contract and work plan and examine research methods for the project to be completed during the internship. In preparation for exit from the program, job search skills, contract work and human resource issues in the museum sector will also be reviewed. The course will be delivered as a combination of group workshops and one-on-one sessions.

Semester 3

MUSM 19
Units/ Hours: 600

The internship provides the opportunity for students to observe and experience at first hand the operations and activities of a museum, gallery or related heritage institution. One of the most important components in the one year program, it allows students to explore their chosen field and assess their aptitude and abilities. The final semester, full-time placement is a primary opportunity to integrate theory and practice. It can be developed as a specialized and focussed learning opportunity or provide a more general overview of museum operations. Internship activity can be implemented at approved local, regional, out of province or international sites. Please note: Tuition fees must be paid prior to internship start up. Internships are unpaid study experiences.

Pre-Requisites