General Arts and Science - University Transfer Curriculum

Accepting Applications for January 2019

See curriculum for: September 2018
Credential: Ontario College Certificate ( 2 semesters )
Classes begin:
January 07, 2019
Offered at:
Sutherland Campus
Program code:
GSU
Tuition & Ancillary Fees:
Domestic:
$2,644.75 per semester*
International:
$8,365.63 per semester*
* Tuition and fees subject to change.
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Courses and Descriptions

Semester 1

HUMN 4
Units/ Hours: 45

In this course the student will learn the role of concepts, models and theories in their own thought, and in scholarly writing, research and discourse. Students will examine the central and remarkable power of the concepts they use in both everyday speech and academic settings and become more rigorous and original critical thinkers. They will also have an appreciation of historical perspectives on language and thought from the Middle Ages to the present. As students progress through the year, they will apply these skills to their writing and in discussions and colloquia.

COMM 62
Units/ Hours: 45

This course introduces students to the excitement and challenge of reading and responding to literature at a first-year university level. Divided into thematic units focused on interpretation (weeks 1-8) and gender (weeks 9-15), the course considers the ways in which texts of different traditions and geographical locations both reflect and shape the vital concerns of their -- and our -- ages. Introduction to Literature also emphasizes the reader as a partner in making meaning, and students will be encouraged to develop their interpretive voices through exploration of a variety of critical perspectives.

HUMN 2
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is the first of a two part introduction to philosophy. Our focus in this course will be on metaphysical and epistemological issues in philosophy. Here we will question the very nature and foundation of the universe and our place within it. We will look at many issues including whether God's existence can be proven, whether humans have free will, what connection, if any, exists between mind and body, and whether knowledge is possible.

SOCI 158
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is a survey course of the psychological concepts and research methods used to understand and explain the principles of human behaviour according to a variety of sub-disciplines in the natural science stream of psychology including behaviour neuroscience, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, cognition, language, motivation, and emotion.

SOCI 104
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is intended to introduce students to the field of sociology and its insights into contemporary society. A primary focus throughout the course will be to help students develop the conceptual tools to understand the relationship between their individual experiences/actions, and the larger context in which individuals live. This makes it possible to see ourselves not just as isolated individuals, but as social actors who are shaped by -- and help to shape -- the world we live in. In addition to core concepts such as culture, socialization and social structure, topics of examination will include social institutions, including the family and education.

COMM 64
Units/ Hours: 45

Writing and Composition I prepares students for the writing challenges they will encounter first in the University Transfer program and later in university. Exercises focus on developing students' ability to produce clear discursive prose, with particular attention paid to elements of structure and mechanics. Students also expand their skills in argumentation by learning how to craft an effective thesis statement and support an argument. Finally, students increase their fluency with different style guides and the tenets of appropriate citation and documentation. The course emphasizes the expository essay, but students successfully completing "Writing and Composition I" will possess skills applicable to a wide variety of academic writing situations.

Semester 2

HUMN 5
Units/ Hours: 30

In this course the student will learn the role of concepts, models and theories in their own thought, and in scholarly writing, research and discourse. Students will examine the central and remarkable power of the concepts they use in both everyday speech and academic settings and become more rigorous and original critical thinkers. They will also have an appreciation of historical perspectives on language and thought from the Middle Ages to the present. As students progress through the year, they will apply these skills to their writing and in discussions and colloquia.

Pre-Requisites
COMM 63
Units/ Hours: 45

This course introduces students to the excitement and challenge of reading and responding to literature at a first-year university level. Divided into thematic units focused on science and nature (weeks 1-8) and modernism and postmodernism (weeks 9-15), the course explores the vital relationship between literature and the central preoccupations, hopes, and anxieties of the modern and contemporary world. Literature and the Modern World also emphasizes the reader as a partner in making meaning, and students will be encouraged to develop their interpretive voices through exploration of a variety of critical perspectives.

Pre-Requisites
HUMN 3
Units/ Hours: 45

Modern Philosophy II, the second of a two-part philosophy course, introduces students to the great tradition of Western philosophy, specifically its history and development, through an intensive examination of central themes, topics, movements, and figures. In this course students study philosophy's origins and explore fundamental philosophical questions concerning knowledge (epistemology), the nature of reality (metaphysics), morality (ethics), and being (ontology), with a specific focus on the period extending from Kantian philosophy to contemporary philosophy. In reading a range of philosophical texts, students experience first-hand philosophy's rigorous method, develop analytical and critical thinking skills, and develop an understanding of and appreciation for philosophy with respect to its real-world applications.

Pre-Requisites
SOCI 103
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is a survey course intended to provide students with a basic understanding of psychology as a framework for explaining the dynamics of human behaviour according to a variety of social science sub-disciplines such as human development, personality theory, abnormal and social processes in human behaviour, as well as health, stress, and coping.

Pre-Requisites
SOCI 105
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is designed to follow Sociology I: An Introduction. We will consolidate and deepen conceptual, analytical and critical thinking skills by covering core sociological concepts and by focusing thematically on selected topics in the study of contemporary society. We will emphasize techniques of sociological inquiry, including primary research. For the final research project, students will conduct sociological research on a topic of their own choosing.

Pre-Requisites
COMM 135
Units/ Hours: 45

Building on skills students have acquired in "Writing and Composition I", this course continues to prepare students for the writing challenges they will encounter in the second semester of the University Transfer program and later in university. In "Writing and Composition II", students are encouraged to develop their critical/analytical and expressive approaches to academic writing through expanded models of essay writing that move students beyond the expository essay. Students engage in various applied writing and reading exercises that strengthen their argumentation and rhetorical skills, develop their ability to conduct advanced research and manage information, and enhance their fluency with elements of style and mechanics. This course emphasizes the essay of argumentation, but students successfully completing "Writing and Composition II" will possess skills applicable to a wide range of academic writing situations.

Pre-Requisites