Fish and Wildlife Technician (Optional Co-op) Curriculum

School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences

Accepting Applications for January 2019

See curriculum for: September 2019
Credential: Ontario College Diploma ( 4 semesters )
Classes begin:
January 07, 2019
Offered at:
Frost Campus
Program code:
BO
Tuition & Ancillary Fees:
Domestic:
$2,206.87 per semester*
International:
$8,004.19 per semester*
* Tuition and fees subject to change.

Courses and Descriptions

Semester 1

MATH 63
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will enable students to apply specific mathematical concepts and acquire foundation skills important in the Natural Resource and Environmental Sciences. It is designed to complement and reinforce learning within other first semester courses and program areas.

COMM 201
Units/ Hours: 45

Communications I is an introductory course that provides a foundation in college-level communications by teaching students to read critically, write appropriately for a variety of audiences, conduct and cite research, and revise for clarity and correctness. In seminars and labs, students will engage in both independent and collaborative activities, including the development of a digital portfolio designed to help them become more effective communicators in academic and professional environments.

ENVR 20
Units/ Hours: 60

Learn how nature works by studying the key components of the ecosystems in the Kawartha Lakes Region. Through field and lab exploration of wild life, landforms, forests, lakes, rivers and wetlands, students will see the connections between themselves, the environment and ecosystems that surround them.

ECOS 13
Units/ Hours: 60

This course will focus on three areas of study: identification, field and lab skills. Students will identify and classify the living and non-living components of the specific ecosystems described in the Ecology and Environment (ENVR 20) course. Field skills to be developed include the ability to navigate through the natural environment and use a variety of ecosystem inventory techniques. Special emphasis will be placed on safe work habits in lab and field.

GEOM 122
Units/ Hours: 90

In this course, students will learn to collect, record, interpret and manage spatial and non-spatial data from a variety of disciplines within the School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences. The use of information technology will be used to manipulate and integrate data in a Geographic Information System, and recognized cartographic standards will be applied to create maps for use in their field of study.

NATR 8
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will enable students to develop a personal position and direct their career path within the context of the environmental and natural resource industry. An integrated, community based learning approach will be used to identify and apply a personal understanding of leadership, sustainability and community in the context of natural resource sciences.

Semester 2

FIWI 42
Units/ Hours: 45

Aquatic Studies is an introduction to some of the basic components and procedures involved in the study of aquatic ecosystems. Fish identification skills as well as aquatic and wetland plant identification skills will be stressed in this course. Invertebrate identification will be introduced. The students will also learn field water chemistry procedures and electrofishing techniques.

APST 154
Units/ Hours: 21

This 7 week course is designed to equip students with the skills needed for their work search and to develop and enhance career planning skills. Students will learn how to write competitive job search documents, interview with confidence, and will develop and use their career portfolio as a tool to identify and incorporate career goals into the job search process.

COMM 202
Units/ Hours: 45

Communications II, building on the foundation of Communications I, is a blended course that teaches students to write and communicate for a variety of professional situations. In seminars, labs and online modules, students will develop a professional portfolio that demonstrates their abilities to meet the challenges of a changing workplace.

Pre-Requisites
SCIE 62
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is designed to provide a knowledge and understanding of the principles of chemistry. The following topics: matter and energy, atomic structure, properties and nomenclature of compounds, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, solutions, acids and bases, and a brief study of organic chemistry will be presented

FSTY 50
Units/ Hours: 60

This course deals with the identification of approximately 100 species of trees and shrubs of importance to those managing the forests resources of Ontario. Throughout the semester identification features for common trees and shrubs in both summer and winter condition are introduced and applied. A number of field trips are utilized to assist students with their identification skills. In the weekly lecture series topics such as tree growth, reproduction, photosynthesis, respiration, forest ecology and uses of trees will be introduced. At the completion of the course students will have a sound working knowledge of dendrology. The skills introduced in this semester may then be used in following semesters when working with Forest Ecosystem Classification, Restoration Ecology, Conservation Planning and other habitat management situations.

FIWI 41
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is an introduction to a range of skills in wildlife observation. A variety of wildlife species may be present in an environment despite not being seen. Important skills include visual and auditory identification of wildlife signs. The primary emphasis in this course will be on identification of wildlife signs such as tracks, trail patterns, scat, skulls, impacts on the environment, bird song and amphibian calls. Documentation of wildlife observation will be practiced regularly. Field guides, photography, binoculars and spotting scopes will be used to document wildlife sightings and their signs.

GNED 49
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is an introduction to the study of Indigenous (First Nations, Metis, and Inuit) peoples in Canada. Students will explore the complex historical and contemporary relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. The course will also guide students to begin to understand the diversity and depth of Indigenous societies, worldviews, and knowledge through a multi-disciplinary lens.

Semester 3

SCIE 32
Units/ Hours: 32

The course provides an introduction to ichthyology, herpetology, ornithology, and mammalogy. Included will be concepts of evolution, behaviour, anatomy, and the physiology of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. The laboratory periods will be used to study, dissect, and identify representative vertebrates.

Pre-Requisites
FIWI 46
Units/ Hours: 34

Almost anywhere you go in the outdoors you see or hear birds. They are an important component of most terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic ecosystems. Being able to identify them is equally important for the management and conservation of these ecosystems and individual bird species. This course builds upon the bird identification skills acquired in semesters 1 and 2 and continues with a more in-depth look at both passerines and non-passerines. Lab activities focus on identification by sight and sound, external topography, aging, and sexing techniques. Lectures explore such issues as avian life histories, monitoring, management, and bird conservation activities in Canada.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
APST 143
Units/ Hours: 40

Field School provides the opportunity for students to integrate theory and practice through intensive hands-on learning in a field setting. It supports knowledge that has been gained during the first year and introduces new skills such as: boat handling, applying the use of GPS units, fish netting, sampling and tagging as well as working under standardized protocols for habitat assessment, wetland classification, bird banding, and use of wildlife monitoring technologies. Through these field school activities, students will work together to collect, analyze and present the data over the remainder of the technician-level education and training.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
FIWI 16
Units/ Hours: 56

The principles, philosophy, and application of fisheries management in Ontario are examined in this course. Case histories will be used to emphasize current topics in natural resource management. The laboratory sessions will stress field activities and hands-on experiences as well as practical expertise in identifying, collecting, and aging fish components.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
FIWI 60
Units/ Hours: 16

The Forage Fish Collection and Report gives students an opportunity to experience a fisheries research project from design, through fieldwork, to the production of a technical report based on data collected. Field activities include the capture of fish through a variety of techniques, identification of fish, preservation of specimens, photography techniques for specimens that should not be harvested, and collection of data on site through observation. Post-field activities include organizing collected data into a properly written technical report, producing maps and tables, and reviewing existing literature to compare and contrast with in-field observations about fish habitat. This project is introduced in 2nd semester where students will use the tools, and acquire the skills required to complete the collection and report independently. The collection and report are submitted in 3rd semester.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
FIWI 17
Units/ Hours: 32

This course provides an introduction to basic limnology, with an emphasis on chemical and physical aspects. Students will learn how to properly use common limnological instruments and sampling devices and to perform aquatic surveys. The concepts of sample and analytical integrity will be stressed, as well as interpretation of results. Laboratory sessions will deal with laboratory and field techniques, while lectures will relate to the principles behind, and rationale for, lab and field techniques.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
APST 147
Units/ Hours: 24

The Freshwater Ecology Field School will bring the student into the field where they will actively collect data on a coldwater trout stream. Data will be collected through standard methods and documented in a manner that reflects protocols currently in use in the industry today. Activities include stream morphology, aquatic invertebrate community assessment, water chemistry, and fish community assessment. Data collected in this course will be used in the co-requisite course Freshwater Ecology FIWI17.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
APST 148
Units/ Hours: 24

Habitat Field School provides the opportunity for students to integrate theory and practice through intensive hands-on learning in a field setting. It supports knowledge that has been gained during the first year and introduces new skills such as: standardized vegetation and soil sampling techniques, habitat polygon delineation techniques and the application of the Ecological Land Classification in habitat classification and assessment. Through field school activities, students will work together to collect, analyze and present the data over the remainder of the technician-level education and training.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
FIWI 61
Units/ Hours: 16

The ability to identify common, indicator and invasive species of vegetation in terrestrial and wetland communities is a skill necessary for identifying significant wildlife habitat, mapping Species at Risk habitat, conducting environmental assessments and classifying lands under the provincial Ecological Land Classification system. Before entering third semester students will collect 45 specimens from various terrestrial and wetland communities that will prepare them for field school.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
APST 149
Units/ Hours: 24

The wetland field school introduces students to the world of swamps, marshes, fens, and bogs. These ecosystems are among the most biologically diverse areas of the province and yet are under constant threat to loss and degradation. Students will learn about wetland biology, hydrology, special features, and human impacts by studying the marsh and swamp on campus - prepare to get muddy. Using the campus wetland as our primary study site, students will collect data following the Ontario Wetland Evaluation System protocol and use the information to prepare a formal wetland evaluation in the semester 4 course Wetland Evaluation and Conservation. A field trip to a local bog and fen will round out the week.

Pre-Requisites
APST 146
Units/ Hours: 24

Wildlife Field School introduces the student to a broad range of essential wildlife technician skills across a range of biota and offers hands-on experience with handling and monitoring wildlife following standardized protocols. Some activities include: learning the proper techniques of handling and banding waterfowl, setting small mammal population census grids and marking small mammals, monitoring the migration of bats, surveying flying squirrels, conducting a forest bird monitoring survey, bioacoustics monitoring, tick surveillance, setting up a bear bait station, and more. This is an exciting and busy field school that runs during the day and evening depending on the activities.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
FIWI 44
Units/ Hours: 24

In this course, students will apply various field techniques to complete an assessment of an ecosite using the Ontario Ecological Land Classification protocol. Students will learn the basics of soil classification and assessment,? and be introduced to a variety of habitat inventory techniques for the assessment of terrestrial wildlife habitats. Following skills and theory learned in Field School, students will conduct an Ecological Land Classification assessment of a forested habitat on campus and assess the suitability of the habitat for wildlife. Independent study of common and indicator plant species will assist students with the identification of specific ecosites.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
FIWI 43
Units/ Hours: 24

This course offers knowledge and practical training in current and emerging technologies important in fish and wildlife management. The technologies covered in this course include but are not restricted to the following: radio and ultrasonic telemetry, GPS navigation, PIT tags, data loggers and a variety of computer applications.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

Semester 4

SCIE 166
Units/ Hours: 60

This course examines the pathology of common and emerging diseases of freshwater fish, and wildlife of Ontario and central Canada. Emphasis will be placed on factors contributing to disease transmission, development and investigation and other topics including animal handling, euthanasia, necropsy techniques, methods of evaluating health parameters and tissue sampling procedures.

Pre-Requisites
FIWI 18
Units/ Hours: 60

This course examines the ecology, biology, and taxonomy of common freshwater aquatic organisms. Additional topics will include an introduction to water pollution (including its effect on aquatic life), food web structure, and the impact of new species invasions.

Pre-Requisites
GEOM 21
Units/ Hours: 45

GIS is the science of deriving, determining, and communicating spatial relationships between and within geographic features. This course will provide the student with the fundamental principles supporting the two main spatial data models, vector and raster, and will introduce concepts of spatial relationships and preliminary spatial analysis related to resource mapping. Students will develop entry-level skills in data capture, data query and in the usage of Geographic Information System (GIS) software.

Pre-Requisites
FIWI 58
Units/ Hours: 21

This course will focus on recreational, commercial, and aboriginal Fisheries case studies. Each case will start with a question, concern, or problem, move through data collection and analysis, consider stakeholder input, and then carry on to a management decision. After the decision the case will explore methods used to achieve compliance, often a combination of public education and law enforcement, this followed by a look at long term results.

Pre-Requisites
MATH 25
Units/ Hours: 45

This course covers data organization, the basic statistical parameters, confidence intervals for means, the normal distribution, hypothesis testing (Chi-square, 'F', 't' and Anova), and regression analysis.

ECOS 35
Units/ Hours: 21

Wetlands are significant landscape features that are all too often dismissed as wastelands. They are however, essential components of a healthy environment from improving water quality to creating and sustaining biodiversity. This course will examine how humans interact with wetlands, wetland hydrology, wetland biology, and some of the rare features and habitats found in wetlands. Through weekly seminars and lectures, students will gain a solid understanding of wetland functions and values, and acquire the contextual knowledge to complete a formal wetland evaluation using data collected during Wetland Field School.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
FIWI 38
Units/ Hours: 60

This course includes instruction in standard field and laboratory techniques used in the study of wildlife and basic principles of wildlife management, with emphasis on aging and sexing techniques. Concepts relating to small game, big game, fur, and waterfowl management will be introduced.

Pre-Requisites
Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.