Environmental Technology Curriculum

School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences

Accepting Applications for September 2018

See curriculum for: January 2019
Credential: Ontario College Advanced Diploma ( 6 semesters )
Classes begin:
September 04, 2018
Offered at:
Frost Campus
Program code:
ETY
Tuition & Ancillary Fees:
Domestic:
$2,145.38 per semester*
International:
$7,793.45 per semester*
* Tuition and fees subject to change.

Courses and Descriptions

Semester 1

MATH 63
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will enable students to apply specific mathematical concepts and acquire foundation skills important in the Natural Resource and Environmental Sciences. It is designed to complement and reinforce learning within other first semester courses and program areas.

COMM 201
Units/ Hours: 45

Communications I is an introductory course that provides a foundation in college-level communications by teaching students to read critically, write appropriately for a variety of audiences, conduct and cite research, and revise for clarity and correctness. In seminars and labs, students will engage in both independent and collaborative activities, including the development of a digital portfolio designed to help them become more effective communicators in academic and professional environments.

ENVR 20
Units/ Hours: 60

Learn how nature works by studying the key components of the ecosystems in the Kawartha Lakes Region. Through field and lab exploration of wild life, landforms, forests, lakes, rivers and wetlands, students will see the connections between themselves, the environment and ecosystems that surround them.

ECOS 13
Units/ Hours: 60

This course will focus on three areas of study: identification, field and lab skills. Students will identify and classify the living and non-living components of the specific ecosystems described in the Ecology and Environment (ENVR 20) course. Field skills to be developed include the ability to navigate through the natural environment and use a variety of ecosystem inventory techniques. Special emphasis will be placed on safe work habits in lab and field.

GEOM 122
Units/ Hours: 90

In this course, students will learn to collect, record, interpret and manage spatial and non-spatial data from a variety of disciplines within the School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences. The use of information technology will be used to manipulate and integrate data in a Geographic Information System, and recognized cartographic standards will be applied to create maps for use in their field of study.

NATR 8
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will enable students to develop a personal position and direct their career path within the context of the environmental and natural resource industry. An integrated, community based learning approach will be used to identify and apply a personal understanding of leadership, sustainability and community in the context of natural resource sciences.

Semester 2

APST 154
Units/ Hours: 21

This 7 week course is designed to equip students with the skills needed for their work search and to develop and enhance career planning skills. Students will learn how to write competitive job search documents, interview with confidence, and will develop and use their career portfolio as a tool to identify and incorporate career goals into the job search process.

COMM 202
Units/ Hours: 45

Communications II, building on the foundation of Communications I, is a blended course that teaches students to write and communicate for a variety of professional situations. In seminars, labs and online modules, students will develop a professional portfolio that demonstrates their abilities to meet the challenges of a changing workplace.

Pre-Requisites
ENVR 10
Units/ Hours: 30

This course examines fundamental components, processes and applied skills in both biotic and abiotic facets of the environment field. The biotic portion of the course will deal with the forces and patterns that shape biological evolution, the nature of the past and present biota of Ontario, and the emergence of ecological thought and conservation biology in the twentieth century. The abiotic portion will deal with the origin, evolution, and current characteristics of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. Various practical applied skills will be examined and practiced to prepare students to work in numerous environmental industries.

ENVR 11
Units/ Hours: 90

This is a lab course that provides the fundamentals and skills required for working in the environmental field. Laboratory work will include hands-on measurement and identification of soil and rock using standard testing procedures. Plant relationships with earth materials will be examined and evaluated. Basic properties of water, introductory hydrogeology and groundwater sampling/monitoring techniques will also be introduced.

SCIE 62
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is designed to provide a knowledge and understanding of the principles of chemistry. The following topics: matter and energy, atomic structure, properties and nomenclature of compounds, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, solutions, acids and bases, and a brief study of organic chemistry will be presented

FSTY 50
Units/ Hours: 60

This course deals with the identification of approximately 100 species of trees and shrubs of importance to those managing the forests resources of Ontario. Throughout the semester identification features for common trees and shrubs in both summer and winter condition are introduced and applied. A number of field trips are utilized to assist students with their identification skills. In the weekly lecture series topics such as tree growth, reproduction, photosynthesis, respiration, forest ecology and uses of trees will be introduced. At the completion of the course students will have a sound working knowledge of dendrology. The skills introduced in this semester may then be used in following semesters when working with Forest Ecosystem Classification, Restoration Ecology, Conservation Planning and other habitat management situations.

Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.

Semester 3

SCIE 6
Units/ Hours: 45

This course provides an introduction to aquatic biology and limnology. Emphasis will be placed on the identification, sampling, and environmental significance of organisms, including aquatic plants, invertebrates, algae, bioindicators, and exotic species. Successful completion of this course requires that students undertake an aquatic plant field collection.

ENVR 8
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is designed to develop student awareness and understanding of various aspects of the environment that are measurable and to relate the importance of these measurements in pollution studies. Students learn how to undertake surface and ground water quality sampling, flow measurement, field and laboratory analysis, data interpretation and reporting. These skills are applicable to lake, stream and ground water quality assessments, microbiological surveys, industrial/municipal inspections and monitoring, watershed studies and pollution prevention/abatement programs.

Pre-Requisites
SURV 18
Units/ Hours: 45

This course places the emphasis on the fundamental principles of Geomatics as they apply to Surveying. Electronic instruments will be used to obtain field positions with features and attribute data. These field locations and attributes will be used to create GIS related survey plans, which can be used in the computation of boundaries areas and volumes. The GIS features will be implemented using practical field projects and the projects will be related to land information systems.

ENVR 15
Units/ Hours: 45

This course seeks to familiarize students with the types of industrially stressed lands that exist. It will outline the problems associated with stressed lands from a land reclamation and rehabilitation standpoint and promote an understanding of what approaches can be taken to rehabilitate land.

ENVR 19
Units/ Hours: 45

This lecture and lab course studies the various components of a watershed (limnology, hydrology, and hydrogeology) and their interactions. Various streamflow sampling techniques and their applications to predictions of flooding and sedimentation will be examined. Attention will be brought to the conflicting demands of use on the watershed and to various remedial options. Legislation under the Conservation Authorities Act and Drainage Act that influences watershed activities will also be presented.

Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.

Semester 4

ENVR 1
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is divided into two modules. The first module will deal with air pollution and abatement by exploring emission sources, meteorological effects, pollution control technology, monitoring, and relevant legislation. In the second module, students will gain an understanding of the role and function of the federal National Pollution Release Inventory.

Pre-Requisites
ENVR 21
Units/ Hours: 45

This course provides emphasis on legislation in the environmental sector. Course content includes in-depth studies of pollution events in various settings with a focus on how and why the event occurred, related industrial and other processes involved and the environmental effect /impact created. Legislative interpretation in various Acts including the Ontario Environmental Protection Act, Ontario Water Resources Act, Nutrient Management Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Environmental Protection Act, Environmental Bill of Rights, Canadian Environmental Protection Act, and other environmental Regulations will be determined.

ENVR 13
Units/ Hours: 45

In this course, various methods of erosion control practices and appropriate approaches are introduced. Types of erosion, causes, and methods of erosion control will be examined. In this light, erosion control approaches that apply to urban, shoreline and agricultural sectors will be presented. Proper field inspection techniques and control measures, including engineering and biological approaches will be examined.

APST 27
Units/ Hours: 44

Field School provides the opportunity for students to integrate theory and practice in a field setting. It supports knowledge that has been gained during the first year. The field school activity also serves as an opportunity to introduce new field environmental techniques that are integrated into the curriculum over the course of the technician-level education and training.

SURV 19
Units/ Hours: 30

In this course, geomatics principles are applied to Land Information Systems. Applied field projects are implemented in to existing geographic and parcel based land fabrics. Extensive use of coordinate geometry (cogo) is used to calculate and plot field projects in CAD based systems. Final plans are place into geographic information systems for manipulation and analysis of spatial data models.

MATH 25
Units/ Hours: 45

This course covers data organization, the basic statistical parameters, confidence intervals for means, the normal distribution, hypothesis testing (Chi-square, 'F', 't' and Anova), and regression analysis.

ENVR 18
Units/ Hours: 60

This course examines the step-by-step processes involved in conventional and alternative water and wastewater treatment processes, and also looks at methods of industrial wastewater and home drinking water treatment in Ontario. In addition, relevant legislation, guidelines, water/wastewater characteristics, and process control laboratory tests will be studied. This information will prepare students to take a number of Ministry of the Environment Certificate examinations that are offered at the completion of the course.

Semester 5

ECOS 1
Units/ Hours: 45

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an improved knowledge of the complexity and interactions present in natural ecosystems. Practical exercises will help to develop and refine field bioinventory, sampling and analytical skills. This course is also designed to promote knowledge and understanding of ecosystem stresses, management, conservation and rehabilitation.

ECOS 4
Units/ Hours: 45

Constructed wetlands are an innovative technology that makes use of natural processes to treat wastewater from a variety of sources including industrial and human waste and are becoming increasingly popular in North America. In this advanced course, students will develop practical skills by learning to design, construct and monitor artificial wetlands for a variety of applications as well as working with the Environmental Technology Program's Solar Ecology wastewater treatment system. Topics covered include wetland processes, biochemistry, wetland design, and sizing calculations, case studies, field trips to wetland projects and construction of functional scale models.

ENVR 5
Units/ Hours: 30

In this course, landscape character is examined, with an emphasis on the biophysical characteristics of the site. This field-based activity will be linked to new development initiatives and/or remediation efforts, as linked to the appropriate legislation and regulation.

GEOL 63
Units/ Hours: 60

This course introduces the fundamental theories and applications of groundwater studies. Lecture topics will include basic principles of groundwater, aquifer investigation, wells, groundwater management, and groundwater geotechniques. Lab efforts will be directed to hydraulic conductivity determinations, flow nets, pump tests, piezometric tests, and uses of test data.

ENVR 12
Units/ Hours: 30

This course examines the technological tools that are available in the environmental sector. Technological skill development, environmental application, and problem solving represent typical areas of study.

APST 28
Units/ Hours: 20

In this course, students take part in practical field exercises in the Fall Semester (Semester 5) that build on the skill set developed from the Technician Level program. These exercises and areas of specialized training for the fall setting may take place at off-campus locations. In some instances, elements are mandatory, and additional specialized training take place on an optional basis. The course is designed to promote a more comprehensive understanding of environmental activity.

ENVR 17
Units/ Hours: 60

This course is designed to provide an understanding of current waste management practices in Ontario, waste management problems and environmental effects, governing legislation, regulatory practices and enforcement, integrated waste management components, landfill site selection, development of waste management system applications, site closure, and post-operational uses.

Semester 6

ENVR 3
Units/ Hours: 60

In this course, the unique nature and behaviour of some environmental contaminants are examined. Concepts introduced will include contaminant transport and fate, toxicity measurement, and hazard assessment. Case studies of current environmental problems will be used to illustrate the ecological complexity of some of these reactions.

ENVR 134
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will explore the elements of rigorous experimental design, commonly used statistical analysis techniques frequently used in environmental research and industry and how to compose a professional technical report incorporating. This course will make use of data collected and materials produced in the courses Environmental Applications and Environmental Techniques.

Pre-Requisites
ENVR 7
Units/ Hours: 45

This course gives students experience in analytical laboratory techniques and instrumentation associated with the environmental workplace. Laboratory work will include hands-on experience in sample collection, preparation, and analysis for both organic and inorganic contaminants as well as exposure to standard laboratory procedures. The theory and practical applications of a variety of standard laboratory methods and instrumentation will also be examined.

ENVR 9
Units/ Hours: 60

This course studies two distinct disciplines: environmental planning and environmental assessment. The environmental planning component applies development related scenarios to provide knowledge in such areas as the Planning Act, zoning by-laws, official plans, Provincial Policy Statement, Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan and ecosystem based planning approaches. The environmental assessment component deals with federal and provincial assessment processes including Class EA's, screening, public participation and implications for the environment.

ENVR 6
Units/ Hours: 45

In this course, the application environmental site assessments and environmental audits will be examined. The tasks required to conduct a phase 1 and/or 2 environmental site assessment under applicable Ontario legislation will be studied. Basic decommissioning and contaminant remediation processes and guidelines will be covered. Relevant standards and/or procedures used to conduct environmental audits (including ISO 14000) will be introduced.

FLPL 71
Units/ Hours: 80

This course is designed to allow students an opportunity to obtain program-related experience while working independently off-campus in the public or private sectors domestically or internationally. It will also provide students with an opportunity to apply existing knowledge and gain new insights into the area of placement. This activity will occur after final examinations. Students will be required to seek a placement location of their choice and then apply to the course faculty for approval.

ENVR 16
Units/ Hours: 60

This advanced course focuses on current concerns related to commodity spills to the environment as well as techniques for environmental cleanup through containment, recovery, and disposal. Course topics will include legislation, oil/gas/chemical spills, leaking underground storage tanks, DNAPL's, operation of gas monitoring equipment, and confined space entry. A number of case studies and videos will be used to reinforce the key course components.

APST 88
Units/ Hours: 20

In this course, students take part in practical field exercises in the Winter (Semester 6) that build on the skill set developed from the Technician Level program. These exercises and areas of specialized training for the winter setting and may take place at off-campus locations. In some instances, elements are mandatory, and additional specialized training take place on an optional basis. The course is designed to promote a more comprehensive understanding of environmental activity.