Cultural Heritage Conservation and Management Curriculum

Accepting Applications for September 2018

Credential: Ontario College Graduate Certificate ( 4 semesters )
Classes begin:
September 04, 2018
Offered at:
Sutherland Campus
Program code:
CHM
Tuition & Ancillary Fees:
Domestic:
$3,198.17 per semester*
International:
$9,829.89 per semester*
* Tuition and fees subject to change.

Courses and Descriptions

Semester 1

SCIE 44
Units/ Hours: 15

This course examines the history of the materials and technology used in the fabrication of artifacts made from ceramic, glass, stone and metal. The origin of these inorganic materials and material characteristics will be studied.

Co-Requisites
MUSM 39
Units/ Hours: 60

This course examines the context for the emergence of the preservation movement and the conservation profession: its history, philosophy, and development: issues in professionalism, including the role of professional associations, accreditations and ethical practice: workplace awareness: written and photographic documentation: and computer applications for conservation.

Co-Requisites
SCIE 38
Units/ Hours: 30

This course provides an introduction to the materials, techniques, applications, and methods available for the treatment, stabilization, and care of ceramics, glass, stone, and metal artefacts. The identification, treatment and stabilization of decorative surfaces including colourants, pigments, etc. are also examined. Accurate condition assessment skills will be emphasized. Relevant theoretical laboratory knowledge and skills will be developed.

Co-Requisites
SCIE 41
Units/ Hours: 90

This course is predominantly applied laboratory work designed to teach the student the principles and techniques of ceramics, glass, stone and metals conservation. This course relies on and further develops an understanding of the history of technology and the characteristics and properties of inorganic materials most commonly found in museum collections. Students will be provided with the opportunity to develop practical and theoretical skills in the identification, assessment, cleaning, stabilization, repair, and care of inorganic materials through a variety of lab projects.A fieldwork component introduces special topics such as conservation and preservation issues related to cemeteries, stone buildings and petroglyphs.

Co-Requisites
SCIE 107
Units/ Hours: 60

Material Science I provides an introduction to inorganic materials encountered in museum collections, including: ceramics, glass, stone and metals. The chemical composition, structure and deterioration of these materials are discussed. A variety of scientific techniques and conservation treatments are presented through lectures, practical experiments, applied projects and self-directed learning.

Co-Requisites
MUSM 40
Units/ Hours: 45

This course introduces integrated approaches to preventive conservation and collections maintenance. Areas of study will include the agents of deterioration and the potential for change in specific materials and/or artifacts, environmental management techniques including the use of specialized equipment, the control of the agents of deterioration and the principles of preservation management, such as policy development, risk assessment, collection surveys, storage, disaster planning, integrated pest management, etc.

Co-Requisites
MUSM 58
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will focus on the fundamentals of digital imaging needed to create digitized images of collection objects for a variety of purposes, while adhering to professional standards of practice. Learners will also be introduced to the principles of graphic design and the software and hardware used to prepare visual materials for museum and gallery applications. By the end of the course, you will be able to identify basic principles and guidelines for good graphic design, use Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign to modify images, layout text, create graphics, plan and manage digital workflow and use production hardware. The course will also give you the basic vocabulary and experience to knowledgeably manage and or outsource digital imaging and graphic design projects.

Semester 2

SCIE 45
Units/ Hours: 15

This course examines the history of the materials and technology used in the fabrication of artifacts made from wood and leather and other proteinaceous materials. The origin of these organic materials and their material characteristics will be studied.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
MUSM 41
Units/ Hours: 60

This course offers students an overview of various exhibitions and display mounting techniques, provides an introduction to the process of exhibit development, policy, planning, design and exhibit maintenance as well as developing specific production skills. Aligned with Management Practices and Laboratory Techniques II, students will acquire an understanding of the integration between preservation strategies, the creation and use of reproductions in exhibits and the promotion and access to collections and cultural property.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
SCIE 39
Units/ Hours: 30

This course provides an introduction to the materials, techniques, applications and methods available for treatment, stabilization and care of wood, leather and proteinaceous materials. The identification treatment and stabilization of decorative surfaces including colourants, finishes, pigments is also examined. Accurate condition assessment skills will be emphasized. Relevant theoretical laboratory knowledge and skills will be developed.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
SCIE 42
Units/ Hours: 90

This course provides an opportunity to develop practical skills in the assessment and treatment and care of a variety of organic materials, including wood, leather, skin, fur, and other collagenous and proteinaceous materials. A variety of object types, such as furniture, mixed media and Indigenous artifacts are presented. In addition, students will examine proven and experimental techniques and related moulding and casting methods and related technologies to create reproductions for object stabilization, conservation and / or exhibit purposes. Special emphasis is placed on ethical awareness in conservation, the creation, use, and care of reproductions, and safe use and maintenance of laboratory tools. Competencies in written, drawn, and photographic documentation are further developed.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
MUSM 42
Units/ Hours: 60

A comprehensive understanding of collections practices allows the Conservator to work more effectively with other collections staff, and/or undertake these functions where required. This course introduces professional standards, ethics and procedures associated with the management of museum collections, with a focus on research, documentation, and registration and records management systems. Related topics include material history research sources and methods; managing temporary deposits, acquisitions and loans; accessioning and cataloguing museum objects; tracking the location and movement of individual items, and providing access to collections and related information through computerized databases and other means. The course also examines the legal and ethical considerations that govern the management of museum objects. An understanding of these, together with practical skills in the planning and implementation of inventory, and the development of collection policy and plans, provides the framework needed for the effective long-term management, control and growth of collections. Finally, this course explores current issues and trends, such as the management of culturally sensitive collections, working with artists, and the growing demand for access to online collections.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
SCIE 108
Units/ Hours: 60

This course provides an introduction to organic materials in museum collections, including: wood, leather, skin, fur, bone antler, horn, ivory, tortoiseshell, feather, and quills. Students will discuss the chemical composition, structure, and deterioration as well as the applied decoration and finishes. A variety of scientific techniques and conservation treatments will be presented through lectures, practical experiments, applied projects, and self-directed learning.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
MUSM 44
Units/ Hours: 45

This course introduces a framework to understand organizational structure and management practices within a Canadian heritage conservation/cultural/arts community. Through a combination of theory, discussion and applied practice, students will explore learning activities such as: personal/professional assessment of strengths and weaknesses; management practices (time management, project management, resource management, etc); business ownership models; basic advocacy and marketing principals. Other areas of investigation will include: market research and planning; the process of responding to a request for proposal (RFP); grant writing; proposal writing and tendering Note: Proficient writing skills are critical for successful course completion. Should these skills be deficient, faculty may recommend upgrading.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

Semester 3

MUSM 43
Units/ Hours: 45

Good stewardship requires the proper care and management of cultural resources and the information associated with them. Taken together, these actions ensure the effective preservation and documentation of, and access to, our tangible and intangible cultural heritage. This course consolidates and builds on knowledge and skills acquired during the preceding two semesters related to the conservation and management of cultural heritage collections. Through presentations from `experts', site visits, and focused research, students will examine best practices associated with caring for and managing specialized types of collections, learn more about their physical and information / records management needs, identify related issues and opportunities, and gain insights into how theory intersects with practice in the field. Importantly, in addition to the tangible objects traditionally collected by museums and galleries, this course will explore standards and practices for managing cultural resources such as Intangible and Built Heritage.

Pre-Requisites
SCIE 46
Units/ Hours: 15

This course examines the history of the materials and the technology used in the fabrication of textile, paper and plastic artifacts. The origins of these materials and material characteristics will be studied.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
MUSM 23
Units/ Hours: 30

The internship is a key opportunity to synthesize theory and practice in an approved conservation laboratory, museum or related setting under the direction of an experienced practitioner. In order to plan for an effective placement, students will complete an assessment of personal needs and resources, update resumes, initiate a search and selection process, negotiate and draft a learning contract and work plan and examine research methods for the project to be completed during the internship. In preparation for exit from the program, job search skills, contract work and human resource issues in the museum sector will also be reviewed. The course will be delivered as a combination of group workshops and one-on-one sessions.

SCIE 40
Units/ Hours: 30

This course provides an introduction to the materials, techniques, applications, and methods available for the treatment, stabilization, and care of textile, paper, parchment, and vellum artifacts. The identification, treatment, and stabilization of decorative surfaces, including colourants, pigments and applied finishes, are also examined. Accurate condition assessment skills will be emphasized. Relevant theoretical laboratory knowledge and skills will be developed.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
SCIE 43
Units/ Hours: 90

This course is predominantly applied laboratory work. The focus will be on the identification and assessment of materials, cleaning methods: basic treatments: repair techniques and storage and display methods for textiles and works of art on paper. Emphasis is placed on the written, drawn and photographic documentation of objects. Conservation skills are developed through the mastery of theoretical and practical laboratory work. NOTE: Students wishing to pursue a specialization in textile conservation should be prepared to develop additional sewing skills.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
SCIE 109
Units/ Hours: 60

Material Science III provides an introduction to organic materials encountered in museum collections, archives and libraries including: paper, parchment, textiles, and information media. Chemical composition, structure, deterioration as well as the applied decoration, using colourants and finishes are discussed. A variety of scientific techniques and conservation treatments are presented through lectures, practical experiments, applied projects and self-directed learning.Pre-requisitesMaterial Science I (SCIE107)Lab Methods I (SCIE038)Lab Techniques I (SCIE041)History of Technology I (SCIE044)Material Science II (SCIE108)Lab Methods II (SCIE039)Lab Techniques II (SCIE042)History of Technology II (SCIE045)Co-requisitesLab Methods III (SCIE040)Lab Techniques III (SCIE043)History of Technology III (SCIE046)Preservation of Books-Photos-Archival Material (SCIE047)

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
SCIE 47
Units/ Hours: 60

The conservation challenges of library and archival holdings are compounded by the nature of the institutions in which they are housed and the provision of public access for research and study. The philosophy of archival and library preservation will be assessed (preservation of information versus the object) as well as integrated approaches to preventive conservation and the increasing use of new technologies and the resulting challenges. Building on the knowledge and skill base developed in the Conservation and Material Science of Paper, this applied course includes off-site visits to, and assessment of, library and archival collections.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

Semester 4

MUSM 21
Units/ Hours: 600

The internship provides the opportunity for students to observe and experience, at first hand, the operations and activities of a conservation practice and preservation management in the public or private sectors. The fifteen week full time block placement is designed to integrate theory and practice as well as introduce new techniques, methods, approaches and equipment beyond the scope of the Fleming program. The internship can be developed as a specialized and focused learning opportunity or a more general placement in preventive conservation and preservation management. Projects are planned and directed with faculty support and implemented under the supervision of a qualified practising conservator or preservation manager.Please Note: Full tuition fees apply and students must be registered with the college before starting their internship. Internships are not paid.

Pre-Requisites