Computer Security and Investigations Curriculum

Accepting Applications for January 2019

See curriculum for: September 2019
Credential: Ontario College Advanced Diploma ( 6 semesters )
Classes begin:
January 07, 2019
Offered at:
Sutherland Campus
Program code:
CSI
Tuition & Ancillary Fees:
Domestic:
$4,246.92 per semester*
International:
$9,786.63 per semester*
* Tuition and fees subject to change.

Courses and Descriptions

Semester 1

COMM 201
Units/ Hours: 45

Communications I is an introductory course that provides a foundation in college-level communications by teaching students to read critically, write appropriately for a variety of audiences, conduct and cite research, and revise for clarity and correctness. In seminars and labs, students will engage in both independent and collaborative activities, including the development of a digital portfolio designed to help them become more effective communicators in academic and professional environments.

COMP 191
Units/ Hours: 45

In this course, the student learns and practices the fundamentals of supporting and troubleshooting computer hardware. With hands-on exercises with dedicated PCs, students will learn the knowledge and skills needed to install, build, upgrade, repair, configure, troubleshoot, optimize, diagnose, and perform preventative maintenance of basic personal computer hardware.

LAWS 245
Units/ Hours: 45

This course provides an introductory overview of the Canadian Justice System. Special emphasis is placed on the criminal, civil and administrative justice systems. The role and responsibilities of Paralegals and Law Clerks in each system will be emphasized. Contemporary issues affecting the systems will be analysed and discussed. Topics covered will include but not be limited to: an introduction to the nature of the law, the legal system, the court system, the legal profession and legal ethics, the Canadian Constitution, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, statutory interpretation, the role of the common law.

MATH 108
Units/ Hours: 60

This course will enable students to apply specific mathematical concepts and acquire foundation skills required for competence in their field. Emphasis is placed on applying these mathematical concepts and skills to solve technical and physical word problems. It is designed to complement and reinforce learning within other first semester courses and program areas.

COMP 86
Units/ Hours: 45

This course provides a foundation for a variety of topics in computer studies including algorithmic solutions and the algorithmic process, information processing, computer programming as well as the system development life cycle. This introduction will focus on algorithmic design and computer solutions using object oriented principles. Lecture material will provide an introduction to the theory and logic behind today's computer oriented society and computer programming in an object oriented environment. Hands on computer labs will allow the student to apply and reinforce the principles of algorithm development and programming in an object oriented environment.

Semester 2

COMP 497
Units/ Hours: 45

Organizations today face the huge task of protecting and securing their sensitive data and information technology operations at many levels. Each year thousands of new vulnerabilities are discovered and Billions of dollars are lost through malicious activity against corporate, government and private technological entities. In this course, Learners will be introduced to the core concepts of information security and protection; examine current threats and vulnerabilities and learn techniques to assess and manage risk in an information technology based environment. Using a common criteria methodology, Learners will analyze/demonstrate common system flaws, malware and control methods; and software for threat assessment and security controls will be explored. Learners will become familiar with the roles and responsibilities of an IT Security professional in relation to the management of risk and the conduct of related threat assessments. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of effectively assessing and making decisions to reduce risk.

LAWS 18
Units/ Hours: 45

Our concern about crime and frustration over criminals are major issues that command our attention. Criminology is a multidisciplinary field that helps us understand and take action. Historically, it has offered many explanations that have influenced our reactions to and social policy toward crime and criminals. This course will consist of three main parts: definitions and measurement of crime, theories of crime, crime and society.

LAWS 84
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will provide the student with an ability to locate, understand and practically apply various sections of the Criminal Code of Canada and Other Federal Statutes in relation to Cyber Crime. The student will also gain an understanding of the various Civil remedies and issues related to cyber crime in Canada. Basic knowledge of Canadian Law is required.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 525
Units/ Hours: 60

This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes.

COMP 91
Units/ Hours: 45

Operating systems manage a computer's hardware and software resources. This course explores many concepts associated with operating systems using MS-DOS, Windows 98, Windows XP, Windows 2000 Server and Linux as hands-on examples. The concepts include:file management, device management, memory management, processor management, process management and system management. A computer professional will manage and configure operating systems to enhance their speed, efficiency, and reliability using a sound knowledge of operating system principles. Often, they will configure the operating system when installing a new operating system, new application software and hardware to a computer system. Students should have competency in basic computer operations.

COMP 234
Units/ Hours: 45

Perl is a 'Practical Extraction and Report Language' freely available for Unix, MVS, VMS, MS/DOS, Macintosh, OS/2, Amiga, and other operating systems. It eclectically combines features and purposes of many command languages. Perl has enjoyed recent popularity for programming World Wide Web electronic forms and generally as glue and gateway between systems, databases, and users.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.

Semester 3

COMP 13
Units/ Hours: 45

Every year, companies all over the world lose millions of dollars due to lost or stolen information, network down-time and natural disasters such as hurricanes, floods, and fires. In most cases, many of these incidents could have been prevented or at least minimized if a security plan had been in place. Until recently, however, computer security was not taken very seriously by most companies. Now, companies are hiring computer security specialists to specifically formulate and implement a computer security plan. This course gives an overview of the technical and managerial aspects of computer and network security.

COMP 51
Units/ Hours: 45

Every year businesses suffer significant economic loss from a variety of threats including intrusions, viruses, theft of data or loss of information. In this course, students will learn about the technical aspects of the Internet and how it can be used as an investigative tool. Students will conduct advanced Internet searches, locate the origin of e-mail messages, track criminals operating on the Internet, investigate computer crime and intrusions, and consider personal computers as an extension of the crime scene.

Pre-Requisites
ELCT 20
Units/ Hours: 45

This is a multi-disciplinary course designed to help students develop their skills in managing technical projects. Students will learn how to identify and plan a project and work toward achieving their project goals. They will interact with a team in ways that contribute to effective working relationships and the achievement of the project goals. They will communicate in written, spoken, or visual format at various stages of the project. The course also includes evaluating the technical, interpersonal, and communication processes the team uses. Students will work on managing a project typical to one that a computer-systems professional would be involved in.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 75
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will provide the student with the knowledge to install, configure and maintain Windows Server 2008. Today's network administrators must be capable of handling a multitude of duties including the use of Active Directory, server resources for clients, managing data storage, network services, providing strong security in order to provide a reliable networking environment.

COMP 526
Units/ Hours: 60

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers, and explains the principles of routing and switching protocols. Students learn how to configure a switches and routers for basic and advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with VLANS, RIP, DHCP, ACL for both IPv4 and IPv6 networks, and NAT for IPv4 networks.

Pre-Requisites
Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.

Semester 4

COMP 528
Units/ Hours: 60

This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network.

Pre-Requisites
LAWS 17
Units/ Hours: 45

The outcome of a successful investigation will often be a criminal or civil proceeding against the perpetrator. However, despite careful evidence collection and analysis, one of the greatest difficulties to be overcome will be the presentation of such evidence to a jury or trier of fact in a manner that is understood and provides maximum support for the case. This course will provide the learner with an opportunity to develop the necessary skills to overcome these obstacles and prepare for their role as both a witness and investigator in legal proceedings. Each learner will be required to have the knowledge to assist in the preparation of crown briefs in support of investigative and prosecutorial objectives. The learner will also review relevant court room procedures, documents and legislation to prepare them for participation in trials and hearings.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
COMP 33
Units/ Hours: 45

Corporate investigators and law enforcement agents are increasingly called upon to perform investigations involving digital evidence. The legal system mandates that these investigations meet standards that protect the rights of all parties involved. In this course, students will learn to apply computer forensic methodology for the preservation of evidence and chain of custody to insure a scientifically reliable examination of that evidence.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 527
Units/ Hours: 60

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, and STP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks.

Pre-Requisites

Semester 5

COMP 3
Units/ Hours: 45

Every year businesses suffer significant economic loss from a variety of threats including intrusions, viruses, theft of data or loss of information. In this course, students will learn about the technical aspects of the Internet and how it can be used as an investigative tool. Students will conduct advanced responses to system compromises and Internet related crimes, including such activities as: searches, locate the origin of e-mail messages, track criminals operating on the Internet, investigate computer crime and intrusions, and consider personal computers as an extension of the crime scene.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 357
Units/ Hours: 45

This class will immerse the student into an interactive environment where they will be shown how to expand upon the basic penetration skills learned in previous courses. New skills will prepare students to scan, test, hack and secure their own systems. The lab intensive environment gives each student in-depth knowledge and practical experience on how to assess the risk to, and penetration test Linux and Windows networks, wireless networks, web servers and voip environments.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 232
Units/ Hours: 45

Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS's) and Firewall Systems attempt to detect and prevent malicious activity among the thousands of packets which travel through corporate network infrastructures. In this course, students will learn, hands-on, how to install and configure software to implement an intrsusion detection system and a firewall system to counter and detect potential malcious attacks.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
COMP 85
Units/ Hours: 45

Today's network incorporates all sorts of wanted but unsettling services. Voice data travels over the network. Files are shared, every new service represents possibilities for sales and also vulnerabilities. In this course students will gain knowledge in developing and applying a sound security framework that provides facilities for managing and protecting internet applications.

Pre-Requisites
ORGB 21
Units/ Hours: 45

In Working with Business and Industry (WBI), you will prepare for the team-based project for an enterprise sponsor in your Applied Project (sixth semester). The enterprise sponsor is one who provides the setting for a real-world problem to form the basis of the project. WBI assists you in forming your team, selecting a project, understanding the project and finally delivering a project plan to your enterprise sponsor. WBI also assists you with understanding the nature of work in your sponsor's and other enterprises. This includes health and safety, company information, ethics, ergonomics, quality standards (such as ISO9000), etc. As well, you will further develop the team, communications, project management and technical skills required when choosing and implementing a full-time project. During two weekly breakout sessions your team, under mentor supervision, will develop the project plan. During the weekly common lecture hour, advisors provide general information about business and industry principles. You will apply these principles in the context of your specific project and sponsor. The final course deliverables are 1) The Project Plan: 2) Demonstration of understanding business and industry: 3) Health and Safety Proficiency. Your team will execute the project in the full-time Applied Project semester that follows.

Pre-Requisites

Semester 6

APST 11
Units/ Hours: 350

In Applied Project, you continue the project, which was planned during the course Working with Business and Industry. This is a team-based project which you will execute full time (no timetable) for an enterprise sponsor. The enterprise sponsor is one who provides the setting for a real-world problem to form the basis of the project. Typically, it is back-burner project that is non-mission critical but can add real value to a sponsor's products and/or services. Most importantly, it will be a learning experience. You continue to work under the guidance of your faculty mentor. Interdisciplinary faculty advisors may assist with communication and team skills. Faculty experts provide assistance with technical skills.