Computer Security and Investigations Curriculum

Accepting Applications for January 2023

See curriculum for: September 2023 January 2024
Credential: Ontario College Advanced Diploma ( 6 semesters )
Classes begin:
January 09, 2023
Offered at:
Sutherland Campus
Program code:
CSI
Tuition & Ancillary Fees:
Domestic:
$3,741.84 per semester*
International:
$10,388.40 per semester*
* Tuition and fees subject to change.

Vocational Learning Outcomes

  • Conduct "threat risk" analysis of an organization's IT assets to determine vulnerabilities and develop appropriate countermeasures.
  • Develop and justify information security policies and procedures for a corporation or institution to mitigate the risk and meet operational requirements.
  • Manage and facilitate the implementation of information security policies and procedures.
  • Conduct analysis of the effectiveness and appropriateness of information security policies, procedures and technology in a changing environment.
  • Report and investigate information security breaches and crimes using the appropriate internal and external resources.
  • Select, assess and implement appropriate security countermeasures for IT assets, such as communication networks, computer hardware and software, to provide protection and support the objectives of the organization.
  • Develop, implement and manage information security emergency plans, disaster recovery plans and business recovery plans.
  • Document, prepare and assist in the presentation of evidence in court cases in compliance with criminal law, rules of evidence and the Charter of Rights and Freedom.
  • Assess information gathering skills used in basic investigative techniques.
  • Work in a manner consistent with all relevant law and legislation and professional, organizational and ethical standards.
  • Distinguish criminal, civil and administrative components of the justice.
  • Make decisions and take courses of action that reflect sound ethical and moral standards of conduct.
  • Develop life long learning habits through the pursuit of interdisciplinary areas of study related to social and cultural understanding, civil life, personal understanding, science and technology, and arts in society.

Courses and Descriptions

Semester 1

COMM 201
Units/ Hours: 45

Communications I is an introductory course that provides a foundation in college-level communications by teaching students to read critically, write appropriately for a variety of audiences, conduct and cite research, and revise for clarity and correctness. In seminars and labs, students will engage in both independent and collaborative activities, including the development of a digital portfolio designed to help them become more effective communicators in academic and professional environments.

COMP 191
Units/ Hours: 45

Today, computers can take on a variety of forms, including household appliances, vehicles, and even human implants. Regardless of the devices shape, size, or complexity, however, a common factor between them all is the computer hardware. During this course students will obtain a foundational understanding of the core hardware components that makeup modern computers. Through experiential-learning exercises and involved experimentation, students will leave the course prepared for in-demand industry certifications and having taken their first steps into the information technology landscape.

COMP 482
Units/ Hours: 45

As technology advances, so does cyber security. With exciting new developments in the field over recent years, it's essential that students are familiar with upcoming cyber trends and new avenues of digital evidence. This course will provide a broad overview of the field, introducing students to useful and current fascinating technologies. Students will leave with a greater understanding of cyber security and digital evidence, its terminology, software utilities for security professionals, and the necessary knowledge to tackle more advanced topics.

MATH 145
Units/ Hours: 60

This course will enable student to apply foundational math concepts and acquire mathematical skills related to computing based programs. Topic coverage will include algebra, number systems, engineering/scientific notation, and trigonometry. It is designed to complement and reinforce learning within other first semester courses.

COMP 91
Units/ Hours: 45

To truly utilize a system to its full extent, one must first become accustomed with the fundamental aspects of the operating system (OS). Hidden just beneath the surface of our desktops, the OS is the main driving force of every system, managing file systems, threads and processes, memory, and much more. In this course, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of OSs, their configuration processes, and how to securely maintain and implement them. Through experiential-learning exercises and involved experimentation, students will leave the course with a firm-grasp on OS troubleshooting, its operational procedures, and the knowledge to begin pursuing a variety of in-demand industry certifications.

COMP 86
Units/ Hours: 45

At one point or another, we've all wished we could automate a monotonous or tedious task. With a scripting language, you can do that and more! This course will introduce students to the programming fundamentals that make up scripting languages. Through experiential-learning exercises with an industry-standard scripting language, students will leave with a foundational understanding of these languages in addition to the practices to use them effectively during their careers.

*Semester 2 for Winter 2023 intake occurs in the Spring semester.

Semester 2

COMP 497
Units/ Hours: 45

Organizations today face the huge task of protecting and securing their sensitive data and information technology operations at many levels. Each year thousands of new vulnerabilities are discovered and Billions of dollars are lost through malicious activity against corporate, government and private technological entities. In this course, Learners will be introduced to the core concepts of information security and protection; examine current threats and vulnerabilities and learn techniques to assess and manage risk in an information technology based environment. Using a common criteria methodology, Learners will analyze/demonstrate common system flaws, malware and control methods; and software for threat assessment and security controls will be explored. Learners will become familiar with the roles and responsibilities of an IT Security professional in relation to the management of risk and the conduct of related threat assessments. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of effectively assessing and making decisions to reduce risk.

COMP 623
Units/ Hours: 60

As technology evolves, the laws governing privacy and its ethical usage must as well. Due to this changing legal landscape, cybersecurity professionals must have a clear and current understanding of cyber laws and their impact on privacy and ethics. This course introduces students to relevant laws in the cyber world, encouraging the exploration and examination of their own and organizations privacy during the digital transformation. Students will leave armed with the skills and knowledge to navigate this complex landscape while juggling the ethical challenges inherent to the field.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 525
Units/ Hours: 60

Computer networks have become the backbone of modern society, facilitating many of our day-to-day activities while constantly evolving to fit our needs. Although these networks may seem like magic, specialized computer hardware and protocols are working in unison to transmit our data around the world. This course provides a broad overview of computer networks, introducing students to essential networking devices, protocols, and security standards. Along the way, students will configure, manage, and maintain computer networks through experiential learning exercises, further developing their problem-solving and troubleshooting skills. Leaving the course, students will be equipped with the fundamental knowledge to pursue advanced computer networking concepts and in-demand industry certifications.

COMP 75
Units/ Hours: 45

Linux is consistently the operating system (OS) of choice, from cars and smartphones to servers and supercomputers. As an open-source project, Linux is flexible enough to satisfy various computing niches, yet it is still well-maintained thanks to the innovation and support from its dedicated community. This course expands upon students understanding of OS fundamentals, focusing on their presence within a Linux environment. Students will familiarize themselves with a comprehensive suite of advanced Linux utilities, facilitating system management, configuration, security, and troubleshooting through experiential learning exercises. Students leaving the course will be equipped with the practices and knowledge to utilize the full potential of Linux systems and pursue in-demand industry certifications.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 593
Units/ Hours: 45

Scripting Applications presents additional topics in Perl, Powershell and Python scripting. New scripting topics include subroutines, associative arrays, threads and child processes, socket programming and interfacing with SQL data bases. Scripting techniques are applied to various security related and other technical applications like log file analysis, password brute forcing, network scanning, windows registry access and process monitoring. Practical exercises are hosted on a mix of windows and linux platforms.

Pre-Requisites
Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.

Semester 3

COMP 13
Units/ Hours: 45

Cybersecurity is a multi-billion-dollar industry, and it impacts us all. From social engineering scams targeting end-users to complex topics like encryption implementation, the work to secure digital infrastructure is endless and constantly evolving. This course is designed to establish baseline knowledge in the concepts, requirements, and operations of cybersecurity in a modern IT department. Students will understand different security treats and how to implement security safeguards effectively. Additionally, students will also gain an understanding for how cybersecurity integrates with other important business operations like physical security, governance and legal. This course maps to introductory industry certifications and will prepare students to complete the certification exam.

COMP 626
Units/ Hours: 45

Databases are an essential part of today's IT infrastructure, providing a flexible and scalable means for data to be efficiently stored and retrieved. Databases are not without their flaws, however, with poor implementations of them being vulnerable to injection and poisoning attacks. In this course, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of industry-standard database applications, their common vulnerabilities, and how to securely implement them in a business/IT environment. Students will leave the course with the skills to overcome database implementation challenges and the experience to properly utilize these applications during their careers.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 38
Units/ Hours: 45

Cyber attacks can happen anytime and anywhere; no one is safe. Although these attacks are inevitable, understanding how you can be attacked and preparing to respond to one are the best ways to protect yourself. This course will introduce students to the principles of both operational security and emergency management. By participating in threat modeling, designing emergency management procedures, and more, students may familiarize themselves with industry-standard practices and the intricacies of these topics. Students will leave the course with a firm grasp on operational security strategies and emergency management procedures, ready to pursue related industry certifications.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 51
Units/ Hours: 45

The internet contains a vast wealth of information. From obscure conspiracies to personal profiles, the internet truly has it all. In this course, students will leverage the capabilities of the internet to perform in-depth online investigations. Students will learn to utilize essential open-source intelligence resources, such as social media, search engines, and more, to compliment investigative techniques and platforms. Leaving the course, students will have a detailed understanding of industry-standard investigative processes, different investigative styles, and a toolkit of indispensable resources that will aid them during their careers.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 631
Units/ Hours: 60

Just like computer systems, computer networks are an integral part of our day-to-day lives, with the internet excellently displaying their usefulness. These resources are essential, requiring diligent time and effort from cybersecurity professionals to effectively secure computer networks. This course introduces students to the core principles of computer network security, including network monitoring, network investigations, network scripting, and identifying/resolving network vulnerabilities. Students will leave the course experienced with securing traditional networks and will be able to begin pursuing in-demand industry certifications that require this pre-requisite knowledge.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 630
Units/ Hours: 60

As we continue to embrace mobile and internet-of-things (IoT) technologies further, wireless computer networks are becoming even more desirable for personal and enterprise usage. Unlike a traditional network that transmits data over a wire, wireless networks rely on radio frequencies to broadcast data. This course introduces students to modern wireless network design and security challenges inherent to the wireless medium. Students will leave the course able to analyze wireless networks from a security perspective. Additionally, they will be equipped to pursue specialized industry certifications related to wireless security.

Pre-Requisites
Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.

Semester 4

COMP 596
Units/ Hours: 45

Agile Project Management (APM) has become an integral part of team work and It team structure in all aspect of Information technology, It is an Iterative approach to planning and guiding a project processes the students will be able to successfully implement agile methodologies and concept such as project envisioning, team velocity, users stories and advanced risk management. Students will also be able to apply all the learning by executing the acquired knowledge along with best practices to be able to deliver successful Information Technology project.

COMP 595
Units/ Hours: 45

With networks speeds increasing and business needs ever-changing, cloud computing has established itself as the next frontier of modern computers. Due to the remote and flexible environment of cloud computing, a tailored approach to its security is necessary. This course introduces students to the concepts, practices, and logistics of cloud computing and cloud security. Students will manage and maintain cloud operating system configurations, access control, and virtualization through experiential learning exercises. As a result, students will have a strong understanding of cloud computing and the security considerations, preparing them for in-demand certifications and their future careers.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 33
Units/ Hours: 45

Intentionally or not, our lives are shared with technology. From daily internet browsing to the photos on our phones, our digital identities have become as significant as their real-life counterparts. Due to this digital transformation, digital evidence has become increasingly valuable to law enforcement, private investigators, and corporations. This course will introduce students to the foundational resources, strategies, and practices used by digital investigators in the field. With an emphasis on digital identities, students will engage in experiential learning exercises, utilizing industry-standard technologies to perform real-world digital investigations. Students will leave the course prepared to tackle advanced investigative concepts and challenges inherent to the field.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 43
Units/ Hours: 45

In the modern and ever-evolving IT landscape, cryptography is an unsung hero. Invisible to the average user, cryptographic technologies work around the clock to facilitate private communications, crypto-currencies, origin authentication, and more. This course will introduce students to the core concepts of cryptography and their practical applications in industry-standard technologies. Students will uncover the significance of cryptography in trending applications, such as blockchain, through experiential learning exercises. Students will leave the course with a firm grasp of cryptography's presence and significance in information security, preparing them for in-demand industry certifications.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 265
Units/ Hours: 45

The best way to evaluate a security posture is to see it in action. Penetration tests (pentests) achieve this by emulating a real cyber-attack to identify security vulnerabilities. Encompassing numerous aspects of cybersecurity, pentests can be as complex as they are intriguing. This course introduces students to the foundational practices, strategies, and ethics of pentests. Through experiential learning exercises, students will utilize industry-standard tools to evaluate a controlled system's security posture, facilitating all phases of the cyber kill-chain. Due to the ethically gray line of pentests, students will also obtain a deep understanding of intrusion analysis by analyzing real-world cyber-attacks and the elements that made them attacks. Students will leave the course with a self-curated "Red Team" toolkit and respect for the ethics of pentests, preparing them for in-demand industry certifications and their future careers.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 625
Units/ Hours: 45

Our world is a connected place, and computer networks serve as the way we digitally communicate with others. From mobile devices to corporate networks, a computer network contains a wealth of information for a forensic examination. From analyzing mobile communications to troubleshooting complex network issues, a forensic examination of a network can have many applicable actions. Students will leave this course with an understanding of how to dive deep into networks, records, logs, and other information to aid in forensic and performance investigations.

Pre-Requisites
ORGB 21
Units/ Hours: 45

In Working with Business and Industry (WBI), you will prepare for the team-based project for an enterprise sponsor in your Applied Project (sixth semester). The enterprise sponsor is one who provides the setting for a real-world problem to form the basis of the project. WBI assists you in forming your team, selecting a project, understanding the project and finally delivering a project plan to your enterprise sponsor. WBI also assists you with understanding the nature of work in your sponsor's and other enterprises. This includes health and safety, company information, ethics, ergonomics, quality standards (such as ISO9000), etc. As well, you will further develop the team, communications, project management and technical skills required when choosing and implementing a full-time project. During two weekly breakout sessions your team, under mentor supervision, will develop the project plan. During the weekly common lecture hour, advisors provide general information about business and industry principles. You will apply these principles in the context of your specific project and sponsor. The final course deliverables are 1) The Project Plan: 2) Demonstration of understanding business and industry: 3) Health and Safety Proficiency. Your team will execute the project in the full-time Applied Project semester that follows.

Semester 5

COMP 3
Units/ Hours: 45

Every year businesses suffer significant economic loss from a variety of threats including intrusions, viruses, theft of data or loss of information. In this course, students will learn about the technical aspects of the Internet and how it can be used as an investigative tool. Students will conduct advanced responses to system compromises and Internet related crimes, including such activities as: searches, locate the origin of e-mail messages, track criminals operating on the Internet, investigate computer crime and intrusions, and consider personal computers as an extension of the crime scene.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 357
Units/ Hours: 45

This class will immerse the student into an interactive environment where they will be shown how to expand upon the basic penetration skills learned in previous courses. New skills will prepare students to scan, test, hack and secure their own systems. The lab intensive environment gives each student in-depth knowledge and practical experience on how to assess the risk to, and penetration test Linux and Windows networks, wireless networks, web servers and voip environments.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 20
Units/ Hours: 45

With Cybercrimes on the rise and threatening organizational data, the need for computer forensics has not been more important in today's computer world. Computer Forensics science is always moving as the devices and level of sophistication of today's computer, cloud, and mobile devices changes. In this course the students will continue to explore the forensics work and dig into all aspects of forensics from Collection, examination, analysis and reporting of Data, the course will allow the student many opportunities to explore real life simulated situations to prepare our students to the real-life forensics work in the field.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 232
Units/ Hours: 45

Firewalls and intrusion detection systems (IDS) are the dynamic duo of computer network security. While firewalls prevent malicious traffic from entering a network, IDSs notify users that a breach has occurred. Although each serves a distinct purpose, both require an understanding of networking protocols, network architecture, and variations of the technologies to successfully secure a network. This course expands students' understanding of firewalls and IDSs by analyzing the technologies' variations, implementations, and configurations through experiential-learning exercises. Leaving the course, students will be prepared for related industry certifications and ready to apply these practices and knowledge during their careers.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 85
Units/ Hours: 45

For cybersecurity to be effective it must become part of what an organization does daily. Topics like security awareness and security by design have become normal for the business world, and security must be integrated into the architecture of the IT resources and services that are used daily. This course will introduce students to the processes for integrating security into the server environments that are used throughout the industry today. From on-premises to the cloud, students will design solutions that are resilient to all types of security threats as well as design measures to detect problems before they happen. The culmination of this course is an understanding of how to integrate security into an organization from the ground up, and the practical experiences to implement security tools.

Pre-Requisites
COMP 624
Units/ Hours: 60

This course combines Security Compliance and Incident response to prepare our students to handle compliance and incident response to protect their organization and effectively deals with latest trends and threats. Compliance to security standards, regulations and laws allows stakeholders including customers and investors to be assured of an organization's Cyber preparedness. Security Compliance closely builds into the Governance and Risk aspects of Information Security.

Pre-Requisites

Semester 6

APST 11
Units/ Hours: 350

The course is offers two modes of experiential learning semester and has two optional implementations, one as an Applied Project and the other as a field Placement. In Applied Project, The students continue their learning with a project, which will be supplied during the first week of class. This is a team-based project which they will execute full time (no timetable) for an enterprise/community/ faculty sponsor. The second option is as a placement opportunity where the student will apply to companies offering placement positions and will compete to get those positions to gain experience working directly in the field and establishing their area of specialization.

Pre-Requisites