Child and Youth Care (formerly Child and Youth Worker) Curriculum

Accepting Applications for January 2019

See curriculum for: September 2019
Credential: Ontario College Advanced Diploma ( 6 semesters )
Classes begin:
January 07, 2019
Offered at:
Sutherland Campus
Program code:
CYW
Tuition & Ancillary Fees:
Domestic:
$2,568.31 per semester*
International:
$8,365.63 per semester*
* Tuition and fees subject to change.

Courses and Descriptions

Semester 1

COMM 201
Units/ Hours: 45

Communications I is an introductory course that provides a foundation in college-level communications by teaching students to read critically, write appropriately for a variety of audiences, conduct and cite research, and revise for clarity and correctness. In seminars and labs, students will engage in both independent and collaborative activities, including the development of a digital portfolio designed to help them become more effective communicators in academic and professional environments.

SOCI 177
Units/ Hours: 45

The student will examine the developmental stages, various familial structures, and functioning of families through the lens of both ecological and family systems theories. Students will be exposed to basic assessment tools such as the ecomap and genogram which help to identify and organize the strength of relationships and patterns of behaviours/outcomes that can be cyclical in nature. Students will explore how family of origin/orientation can impact individual members through their life using both case scenarios and their own histories. The concept of the family as a dynamic entity affected by ecological impacts will also be highlighted throughout the course.

SOCI 176
Units/ Hours: 60

The evolution of the role of child and youth care worker will be explored and defined as it applies to six main contexts: residential, school, hospital, community, outreach and family. You will examine the core values, traditions, practices and theoretical underpinnings that guide relational child and youth care practice as well as identify personal values, beliefs, and styles that will impact the development of your professional identity. The student will be able to identify signs and symptoms of job related stress associated with compassion fatigue as well as burnout and create an action plan for daily living to handle such occurrences.

COMP 345
Units/ Hours: 45

Working in the Windows 7 environment, this computer course introduces the student to computer basics (computer terminology, e-mail, file management) and the application and use of word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software using Microsoft Office 2016. Through the extensive use of hands-on activities, students will gain sufficient knowledge and experience to make productive use of computers as a tool in the college and workplace environments.

COUN 94
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will introduce students to various forms of trauma, both within and outside of the familial environment (such as child maltreatment, school violence, domestic violence, relational trauma (ie. impact of divorce) medical trauma, natural disasters, terrorism, traumatic grief, systemic abuse & neglect, and refugee and war zone trauma). Focus will be on indicators of trauma, typology, symptoms of trauma, disclosure, reporting laws, system responses, interventions (including safety plans) and emphasis placed on vicarious trauma. The course will also focus on the different impact of maltreatment and intervention considerations with respect to culture and a variety of minority populations.

SOCI 233
Units/ Hours: 45

Human development across the lifespan will be studied by exploring the interrelationship between biological, psychological and sociocultural influences from conception to end of life. Upon completion of the course, learners will have an understanding of individual development, in addition to the impact of lifespan development on families and communities. Learners will have the opportunity to follow an individual's development throughout the lifespan, using a variety of biopsychosocial factors.

GNED 49
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is an introduction to the study of Indigenous (First Nations, Metis, and Inuit) peoples in Canada. Students will explore the complex historical and contemporary relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. The course will also guide students to begin to understand the diversity and depth of Indigenous societies, worldviews, and knowledge through a multi-disciplinary lens.

Semester 2

COUN 102
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is designed to focus on the creation of the therapeutic relationship through the use of the relational strength-based approach. Specifically, the focus will be on creative engagement and micro-counselling skills (such as active listening, non-verbal and verbal effective communication skills). An emphasis will also placed on the learner's ability to demonstrate cultural competency, respect and warmth as well as the appropriate use of boundaries through class interactions and role-play. Through out the course, learners will engage in reflective self-assessment so they may be aware of not only their strengths and areas for development but also how their personalities, attitudes and behaviors may facilitate or interfere with establishing the therapeutic alliance.

Pre-Requisites
COUN 104
Units/ Hours: 30

This course will focus on the importance of creating therapeutic environments that can both build on and further enhance the therapeutic alliance through feelings of felt safety, belonging, mastery, generosity and independence. Specifically, the following settings will be examined: residential, school, family, community, hospital, and outreach. The learner will discover as well as explore the impact of these different settings on children and youth and will learn how children/youth interpret and engage in these types of surroundings.

Pre-Requisites
COUN 103
Units/ Hours: 60

This course provides learners with an understanding of the development of mental health Services in Canada and Ontario with an emphasis on current legislation, available resources and resulting practices. It provides an introduction to the identification and assessment of children's mental health issues (including the DSM) as well as a description of the most commonly diagnosed disorders. Perspectives surrounding the nature of wellbeing will be discussed with an emphasis on relational, holistic and strength-based approaches. Learners will also explore their own subjective responses to mental health as well as differing societal cultural contexts and the potential impact this might have on the children, youth, and families.

Pre-Requisites
SOCI 179
Units/ Hours: 45

This course encompasses the skills and knowledge students will need in order to plan various therapeutic recreational, social, and learning activities using an activity process model. The student will learn the steps and methods to plan, implement and evaluate activities to meet the developmental needs and treatment goals of the individual and client group with the activity process model. The students will demonstrate the ability to teach instrumental life skills and social skills to children and adolescents using leadership skills, with the purpose of illustrating to clients? their ability to experience autonomy. Throughout the course, students will explore their own leadership styles, decision-making processes, and facilitation abilities by way of in-class activities and the creation of an ePortfolio. The emphasis of this course is providing learners with essential skills they can use in educational, mental health and various treatment settings.

Pre-Requisites
LAWS 276
Units/ Hours: 30

This course will provide an overview of relevant legislation as it relates to the potential impact on children, youth, and families in Ontario. Learners will examine the subjective nature of the law and how this is both disadvantageous and advantageous to both worker and clients in the outcome of service delivery. Services and facilities in Ontario operating under Federal and Provincial Acts will be examined with an emphasis on differentiating between not for profit and profit types and transfer versus non-transfer types. Learners will explore personal impacts of children's and youth's stories within child and youth care systems that may lead to vicarious trauma.

Pre-Requisites
COUN 101
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will focus on the comparison between those who experienced healthy development as opposed to those whose development has been impacted by traumatic experiences. Specifically, we will examine the differences in environmental factors, physiology and brain functioning with a focus on identifying those with trauma histories, post-traumatic stress symptomology and related disorders with the purpose of limiting triggers and increasing coping abilities. An emphasis will be placed on the theories of attachment, grief and loss as well as the circle of courage framework and holistic wellbeing.

Pre-Requisites
SOCI 178
Units/ Hours: 45

The principles of learning will be explored through a strengths-based CYW perspective. Learners will be introduced to the main concepts of classical and operant conditioning and observational learning. The course focus will be on the application of the principles of learning to developing positive behavioural management programs that meet the specific needs of individual children and youth. Learners will practice skills of behavioural observation and data collection, and will demonstrate learning through development and completion of a personal positive behaviour management program.

FLPL 202
Units/ Hours: 30

This course builds on the CYC competencies of communication, professionalism, relationships and systems in order to prepare students to obtain, negotiate and participate in field experience. Learners will explore what it means to be a responsible practitioner who takes an active role in seeking out personal growth/supervision from a variety of resources as well as address conflict management (including reparation) and potential practice issues. Learners will develop their professional presentation skills, including awareness of presence/public image as it relates to public speaking, team/group work, and use of social media. There will be an emphasis on the importance of professionalism in providing felt safety for children, youth and families as well as for creating collegial organizational culture.

Pre-Requisites

Semester 3

FLPL 154
Units/ Hours: 224

This first placement is an opportunity for students to apply and be assessed in the skills and knowledge gained in the 7 domains of practice, albeit there will be a higher emphasis on the student's competency in the domains of self, professionalism and communication. The placement will occur within a setting of the student's choosing (residential, school, family, hospital, community or outreach) and the student will be working towards approximately 224 placement hours over the back 7 weeks of the semester. Each placement student will receive both a faculty and an agency supervisor with whom to debrief and analyze placement experiences on a weekly basis. Please note that students must have permission from the coordinator to take part in all field practicums. Pre-requisites: COUN30, COUN64, COUN110, COUN111, COMM160

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
FLPL 153
Units/ Hours: 21

Students engaged in practicum must also be enrolled in Integrative Seminar. This course is an opportunity for students to receive an additional three hours a week of supervision that is supplementary to practicum I course expectations. The student will debrief and analyze their competencies in the 7 domains with faculty/peers, albeit there will be a higher emphasis on the student's competency in the domains of self, professionalism and communication. Pre-requisites: COUN30, COUN64, COUN110, COUN111, COMM160

Pre-Requisites
COUN 74
Units/ Hours: 45

This course is a continuation of Leadership and Group Facilitation. The student will examine the therapeutic value of play and receive exposure to a variety of activities that can be used with children, youth, and families. The importance of activity selection will be highlighted throughout the course as it relates to the cultural and developmental stage of activity participants. In addition, students will learn how to evaluate activity programming to determine effectiveness. Most importantly, learners will discover the pleasure and freedom play offers children and youth. They will also engage in reflective practice as they rediscover their personal experiences so that the child/youth is exposed to opportunities for personal exploration.

Pre-Requisites
COUN 110
Units/ Hours: 28

This course builds on Therapeutic Interventions I whereby learners continue to focus on the creation and use of the therapeutic alliance within a relational strength-based approach. Specifically, it is designed to examine the diversity of theoretical and practical approaches to the assessment, treatment and interventions used in the therapeutic practice for children, youth and their families. The method and value of the life-space interview as well as play-based and Aboriginal healing practices will be emphasized throughout the course.

Pre-Requisites
SOCI 180
Units/ Hours: 15

The purpose of this course is to provide learners with a practical understanding of crisis intervention and the various strategies used to provide the best possible Care, Welfare, Safety and Security when working with children, youth, and families. Topics to be included are: crisis theories, trauma response protocols, debriefing protocols, worker safety/self-care, and creation of stress/safety plans.

Pre-Requisites
COUN 111
Units/ Hours: 35

The learner will be able to identify and work effectively with two categories of behaviours: internalizing behaviours (acting in) and externalizing behaviours (acting out). Topics to be included are; disorder and gender specific interventions/programming, increasing and decreasing emotional arousal assessing for and differentiating between those that are self-injurious or with suicidal ideation, assessing risk-taking, and the use of relational, holistic and strength-based approaches. The importance of creating intervention plans using dialectical behavioral therapy (specifically, mindfulness), narrative therapy (specifically, re-framing labels), and cognitive behavioral approaches will be highlighted throughout the course. In addition, learners will increase their awareness of community based mental health resources.

Pre-Requisites
COMM 160
Units/ Hours: 28

Students will learn the difference between objective and subjective recounting of events, both verbally and written, as well as the potential purposes of each type. Learners will then create objective, culturally competent writing within a strength-based framework based on their subjective observations of children, youth, and families.

Pre-Requisites

Semester 4

FLPL 156
Units/ Hours: 448

This second placement is an opportunity for students to apply and be assessed in the skills and knowledge gained in the 7 domains of practice, albeit there will be a higher emphasis on the student's competency in the domains of relationship and interventions. The placement will occur within a setting of the student's choosing (residential, school, family, hospital, community or outreach) and the student will be working towards approximately 448 placement hours over 14 weeks. Each placement student will receive both a faculty and an agency supervisor with whom to debrief and analyze placement experiences. Please note that students must have permission from the coordinator to take part in all field practicums.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
FLPL 155
Units/ Hours: 45

Students engaged in practicum must also be enrolled in Integrative Seminar. This course is an opportunity for students to receive an additional three hours a week of supervision that is supplementary to practicum course II expectations. The student will debrief and analyze their competencies in the 7 domains with faculty/peers, albeit there will be a higher emphasis on the student's competency in the domains of relationship and intervention.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
COUN 71
Units/ Hours: 45

The student will be able to define the classes of drugs, identify signs of usage, understand street and prescription substance use interactions, as well as identify and manage psychopharmacological side effects and withdrawal. Historical aspects that have shaped current application of psychopharmacology will be explored. The importance of taking into consideration situational and cultural factors when examining the need for psychopharmacological treatment will be highlighted throughout the course.

Pre-Requisites

Semester 5

COUN 75
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will examine current social welfare programs as well as describe how policy and legislation is created through the different levels of government. Learners will research and critique an agency?s philosophy, structure, operations, and justify their use of outcome measurement tools in an effort to improve their own understanding about quality assurance. They will become familiar with appeal procedures and agencies that aim to protect the rights of children. In addition, learners will identify the different types of advocacy and various strategies that might be implored to create change while utilizing personal support systems to limit the effects of any negativity encountered. The concept of power differential among members of society and the importance of using an anti-oppressive strength-based partnership framework from an ethics perspective will be highlighted throughout the course.

Pre-Requisites
COUN 78
Units/ Hours: 45

This advanced and culminating skills course is designed to build upon Therapeutic Interventions I, II and Crisis Intervention whereby learners continue to focus on the creation and use of the therapeutic relationship within a relational strength-based approach. Specifically, an emphasis will be placed on Solution-focused counselling (SFC) and Motivational Interviewing (MI), which lend themselves well to settings where the work is time limited. Learners will also expand upon previous knowledge in relation to both narrative and play-based approaches. Throughout the course, learners will engage in reflective self-assessment so they may be aware of their theoretical preferences and begin to establish their own praxis.

Pre-Requisites
COUN 77
Units/ Hours: 45

This course will examine the concepts of family support, family preservation, and family reunification and the strategies involved with each within the child and youth care role. Historical and current issues that impact family dynamics will also be explored with a specific emphasis on compounding effects of poverty. Students will conduct assessments to develop role appropriate goals with parents and/or children in hypothetical case situations and analyse their success. Throughout the course, the application of family systems theory and the power of mediation will be highlighted. Understanding the impact multiculturalism has on the white hegemonic perceptions of the traditional family.

Pre-Requisites
COUN 76
Units/ Hours: 45

The student will be able to identify, assess through screening tools, and provide treatment, using best practice, for children and youth with concurrent disorders while reducing the impact of stigma. Topics included are; biological/medical perspective, social and cultural forces that impact behaviour, the concept of self-medication, harm reduction models, theory of change model, the use of integrated approaches to treatment, and mental health legislation in Ontario. A strength-based and relational approach to working with clients who have concurrent disorders will be highlighted through out the course as well as an understanding of the impact of social labelling.

Pre-Requisites
SOCI 181
Units/ Hours: 45

This course introduces learners to the values and beliefs embedded within the Child and Youth Care Code of Ethics. Students will be exposed to different scenarios demonstrating how this code may come into conflict with personal values, agencies policies, other professional codes of ethics and or federal and provincial legislation resulting in ethical dilemmas. Contemporary issues in child and youth care practice and their ethical implications will be examined. The ethical decision making model will be highlighted throughout the course.

Pre-Requisites
COUN 79
Units/ Hours: 45

This advanced and culminating skills course builds upon Leadership and Group Facilitation, Therapeutic Milieu and Therapeutic Activities whereby learners will continue to focus on the benefits of play and social skill instruction within the design, delivery and evaluation of group work. Students will participate in a learning group from start to end that requires them to create group contracts, build cohesion using effective team building strategies, and resolve conflicts that may arise. In addition, students will design a five session group for children, youth and/or families, including the use of activities, and deliver/evaluate at least one of these using their peers as their audience. The importance of group processing will be highlighted through out the course.

Pre-Requisites
FLPL 157
Units/ Hours: 30

Learners will examine the professionalization of our field and determine their own stance on topics such as standards of practice, titling, regulation, certification, and accreditation. They will analyze their own development while in the program and be able to express their professional identity as a child and youth care worker. They will also explore how to handle feelings of incompetency in practice while assessing supervision needs (seeking a mentor, debriefing) and planning for these as they move from the role of student to practioner. Furthermore, learners will have the opportunity to experience panel interviews in order to refine their professional presentation skills and learn how to respond to scenario-based questioning.

Pre-Requisites
Units/ Hours: 45

All graduates of diploma programs require general education credits. These courses allow you to explore issues of societal concern by looking at the history, theory and contemporary applications of those issues.

Your program has designated some required general education courses. In addition, you have the opportunity to choose from a list of electives each semester.

Many of these courses and some other general education courses are also available through evening classes, by distance education, or on-line. See our Part-Time Studies Calendar for these opportunities.

You may already possess general education equivalencies from other colleges or universities. Please see the General Education Co-ordinators at the Peterborough and Lindsay locations for possible exemptions.

In order to obtain the Indigenous Perspectives Designation, students must choose GNED128 as their Gen Ed Elective.

Semester 6

FLPL 158
Units/ Hours: 45

Students engaged in practicum must also be enrolled in Integrative Seminar. This course is an opportunity for students to receive an additional three hours a week of supervision that is supplementary to practicum course III expectations. The student will debrief and analyze their competencies in the 7 domains with faculty/peers, albeit there will be a higher emphasis on the student's competency in the domains of applied development and systems.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites
COUN 80
Units/ Hours: 30

Students will be exposed to a variety of intervention and evaluation strategies that form the basis of effective and accountable case management in the child and youth care role. Using a holistic/ecological model of practice and from a client-directed framework, students will learn to create short and long-term treatment plans based on a case scenario. This will require the application of numerous skills learned in earlier courses in the child and youth care program. This course is done in conjunction with placement using a web-based approach. Students will be able to use placement experiences as a basis for their case management skills development.

Co-Requisites
FLPL 159
Units/ Hours: 448

This third placement is an opportunity for students to apply and be assessed in the skills and knowledge gained in the 7 domains of practice, albeit there will be a higher emphasis on the student's competency in the domains of applied development and systems. The placement will occur within a setting of the student's choosing (residential, school, family, hospital, community or outreach) and the student will be working towards approximately 448 placement hours over 14 weeks. Each placement student will receive both a faculty and an agency supervisor with whom to debrief and analyze placement experiences. Please note that students must have permission from the coordinator to take part in all field practicums.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites