ReINVENT YOURSELF THIS FALL

ReINVENT YOURSELF THIS FALL

Fleming College is inviting you to ReINVENT YOURSELF THIS FALL by checking out the college’s new Continuing Education calendar.With more than 50 new courses and certificates there’s never been a better time to continue your personal journey of life-long learning. Courses are offered at each of Fleming’s campus locations in Peterborough, Lindsay, Cobourg and Haliburton.Courses are offered in Business, Community, Computers, Environmental and Natural Resource Studies, Leisure and Lifestyle, Health Studies, Hospitality and Wellness, Languages and Communication, Law and Justice, and Technology and Skilled Trade Professions. On-line courses are available through OntarioLearn. Fleming College also offers an array of courses for adults 55+ ranging from Computers to Genealogy to Financial Planning.Here are just a few of the new courses in Continuing Education at Fleming: Home Inspection Certificate Advanced Food Safety Training Urban Survival Effective Presentations Introduction to Herbology The Art of Barbequing and Smoking French Bistro Cooking Introduction to ImprovThe Fleming College Continuing Education calendar is available online at www.flemingcollege.com or by calling 1-888-269-6929.

New Programs Approved

New Programs Approved
(l-r) Fleming President Dr. Tony Tilly, Trent University President Bonnie Patterson, Peterborough MPP Jeff Leal and Robin Armstrong, Executive Director of the College University Consortium Council, at the introduction of the new Ecological Restoration

Fleming College’s Board of Governors has approved three new programs – a joint degree-diploma in Ecological Restoration, a Powered Lift Technician diploma and, through OntarioLearn’s distance education program, a new diploma in Military Arts and Science.The Ecological Restoration program, announced in May, is a joint four-year program being developed in collaboration with Trent University. Students spend the first two years of the program at Fleming’s Frost Campus and then spend years three and four at Trent. Students successfully completing the program will graduate with an Ontario College Diploma and a BSc Honours in Ecological Restoration. The program is expected to begin in September 2008.With the amount of growth in the heavy equipment industry, the need for technicians to service the various types of equipment used across the industry continues to rise. A new diploma program, Powered Lift Technician, will provide students with the specialized skills to diagnose problems, troubleshoot, maintain and repair powered lift equipment engines and their component parts and systems, including hydraulic lifts. The new program, scheduled to begin in January 2009, will be offered within the Centre for Heavy Equipment Technology, located at the Frost Campus.Beginning in September 2007, Fleming will offer a new diploma program in Military Arts and Science through OntarioLearn. This is a part-time program, developed for non-commissioned members of the Canadian Armed Forces, which will be delivered through distance education. The Royal Military College in Kingston will deliver seven core courses while OntarioLearn will offer the rest. 

Students raise funds for eagle conservation

Students raise funds for eagle conservation
A group of students from the School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences raised more than $5,000 in grants to support bald eagle conservation.

A group of Fleming College students with a passion for conservation has raised more than $5,000 in grants to support the bald eagle population in southern Ontario.The students, in the Fish and Wildlife program at the Frost Campus, became interested in fundraising for the eagles last fall when taking a Wildlife Technologies course taught by Fleming faculty member Dave Wood. Within the course, students learn about satellite telemetry. Bird Studies Canada (BSC) has a web site that displays the tracking of bald eagles through special transmitters, which the students use as a study tool. It’s data that can only be seen with this type of technology.The students formed the group with the goal of raising enough money to purchase a transmitter for an eagle in a local nest in the Peterborough area. The group raised $5,341 through special grants from the Ministry of Natural Resources Community Fisheries and Wildlife Involvement Program and the Victoria Stewardship Council, as well as through individual donations.BSC is planning to place the transmitter in a local nest next summer. Students at Fleming will be able to use the data and track the eagle online for a three to five-year period. Despite recently being taken off the endangered species list in the United States, the southern Ontario population of bald eagles is still at risk. The eagle was officially listed as an endangered species in Ontario in 1973. Since that time, BSC has worked with all levels of government, landowners and volunteers to affect and monitor the recovery of the eagle population in southern Ontario. The population is rebounding – from zero nesting pairs in 1980 to 34 pairs last year.However, BSC is conducting research on the effect contaminants are having on the eagle population in Ontario. In collaboration with the Canadian Wildlife Service and the Ministry of Natural Resources, BSC initiated a special project in 2004 to determine where these migratory birds may be acquiring toxic chemicals. The project uses satellite telemetry to track the movements of young eagles hatched in Ontario for up to five years.BSC is interested in hearing about bald eagle sightings in the Kawarthas. If you have spotted an eagle in the area, please contact Jody Allair of BSC at raptor@bsc-eoc.org The mission of Bird Studies Canada is to advance the understanding, appreciation, and conservation of wild birds and their habitats, in Canada and elsewhere, through studies that engage the skills, enthusiasm, and support of its members, volunteers, and the interested public.Bird Studies Canada is a not-for-profit organization built on the enthusiastic contributions of thousands of volunteer Citizen Scientists. Data from BSC’s volunteer surveys and targeted research projects are used to identify significant population changes and help direct conservation planning. For more information, please visit www.bsc-eoc.org

40th Convocation at Fleming

40th Convocation at Fleming
 Graduates at the School of Law and Justice convocation on June 15.

With smiles, hugs and a few tears, more than 2,200 Fleming students graduated at the college’s 40th annual convocation ceremonies at all campuses between June 1 and 15. Ceremonies took place on June 1 in Haliburton, June 8 at Frost, June 11 in Cobourg and June 12 to 15 in Peterborough.Students heard words of wisdom and advice from community and college leaders, alumni, their teachers and peers throughout each ceremony.School of Law and Justice valedictorian Mitch Homuth, graduate of the Firefighter Education and Training program, advised students to keep their sense of humour through life’s ups and downs."Humour has an amazing power. It protects us from the uncontrollable facts of life. It emboldens us; it enables us to accept our condition and to move on. Laugh equally hard when you fail as when you triumph. Today is a day of triumph. You have earned the right to throw your head back and laugh out loud," he said. "And on those days when life is a little darker, remember give yourself permission to laugh just as loudly. There’s no doubt that the laughter I shared with friends here at Fleming made my time fly by too quickly."  Practical Nursing grad Melissa Keigher gave credit to Fleming faculty and staff during her valedictorian address at the convocation for the School of Health and Wellness."A big thank you to our tireless instructors who never ceased to encourage, challenge and most importantly inspire us to be our personal best; perhaps to become even greater than our own expectations. How lucky we all are that we chose Fleming College where there exists faculty and support staff that are so passionate and dedicated in what they do."Sporting Goods Business alumni and Premier’s Award nominee Neil Wensley, speaking at the School of Business convocation, encouraged graduates to go after their goals. "Don’t play it safe – ever. Focus on your dream," he said.Also at convocation, Teresa Good and Carmen Moore were presented with the Charles E. Pascal Award for Excellence in Teaching. Jim Blake, Lynda Kay and Fran Fearnley were awarded Fellowships in Applied Education, and former Peterborough Mayor Sylvia Sutherland, whose husband David was Fleming’s first president, was given an honorary diploma.

Rick’s Mayoh’s Story

Rick’s Mayoh’s Story

Rick Mayoh is one of Fleming College’s Premier’s Awards nominees. The awards – given out each February at the Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario annual conference – recognize the contribution of outstanding college graduates. Rick, a graduate of the college’s Drug and Alcohol Counsellor program (2004), has been waging an ongoing battle against the demons that face Inuit society, a culture that has been crippled by high rates of addiction, abuse and suicide. Counselling Inuit clients struggling with trauma and addiction at the Mamisarvik Healing Centre in Ottawa, Rick is a vital part of the eight-week residential program of non-profit Tungasuvvingat Inuit, the only comprehensive Inuit agency of its kind in Canada. “I feel life moved me into a position to do this,” he says from his home in Ottawa. On a day-to-day basis, Rick’s work involves extensive group therapy – primarily on anger management, assertiveness and aftercare – and he is also a residential counsellor at the Pigiarvik House residence, which includes individual counselling, and facilitating cultural and recreational activities. He says working to heal the trauma the Inuit people face – including Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, violence, loss of identity, homelessness and sexual, physical and emotional abuse – is as challenging as his field gets. The Inuit have one of the highest suicide rates in the world at 11 times the national average – 40 times the national average for males aged 15 to 24 – and Canada’s highest rate of violence and violence against women at 10 times the national average. Rick’s journey to Mamisarvik is connected to his own recovery from addiction that began 12 years ago. An NHL writer and sports journalist at the Ottawa Citizen for more than 20 years, Rick’s interest swung to the world of drug and alcohol counselling when he started working on his recovery. “I was so grateful for how things were going and there was a strong element of wanting to give back,” he says. “My whole motivation is to make my work an extension of my own recovery” . As his health improved, Rick’s interest “exploded” in that direction. After leaving the Ottawa Citizen in 1996, he was a freelance reporter for six years in Ottawa before starting at Fleming in 2003.Despite living down the street from Algonquin College, which also has an addiction program, he chose to make the seven-hour round-trip down Highway 7 to Peterborough every week. “One of Fleming’s biggest attractions is that its program is so outstanding. There isn’t one like it in the country.”The fact that the University of Lethbridge accepts every credit in the program at face value was a testament for Rick to the way faculty members Bill Peacock and Joe Ellis built the program. Commuting more than 100 times from Ottawa in a rusty 15-year-old Honda, Rick finished the program at the top of his class with a 95 per cent average. His field placement, arranged by Fleming, took him to the Caribbean island of Antigua to one of the top recovery facilities in the world, Crossroads, founded and owned by musician Eric Clapton. Now Rick is combining is burgeoning knowledge of Inuit culture (he’s even committed to learning the language of Inuktitut) and his passion for journalism. In his down time, he works on writing articles on the plight of the Inuit. “I’m doing advocacy and not just counselling. I’m trying to raise southern awareness to help the the Inuit get the help they need. They seem to have a stranglehold on every negative demographic,” he says. However, despite the tough job of helping Inuit through the many desperate issues they face, he has found counselling very rewarding. “You see the shape people come in, in the first week of the program, and then you see the transformation as they leave after the eighth week – it’s incredible. Seeing that progress so quickly is hugely satisfying, knowing you’ve been a part of that. You’re able to see the impact of the agency’s work quite quickly.” Of the 13 people on staff at Mamisarvik, 10 are Inuit. As a non-Inuit counsellor, “I’ve got the biggest learning curve,” says Rick. “What I can give back is experience, but I’m getting back more than what I am giving.” 

Rick’s Mayoh’s Story

Rick’s Mayoh’s Story

Rick Mayoh is one of Fleming College’s Premier’s Awards nominees. The awards – given out each February at the Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario annual conference – recognize the contribution of outstanding college graduates. Rick, a graduate of the college’s Drug and Alcohol Counsellor program (2004), has been waging an ongoing battle against the demons that face Inuit society, a culture that has been crippled by high rates of addiction, abuse and suicide. Counselling Inuit clients struggling with trauma and addiction at the Mamisarvik Healing Centre in Ottawa, Rick is a vital part of the eight-week residential program of non-profit Tungasuvvingat Inuit, the only comprehensive Inuit agency of its kind in Canada. “I feel life moved me into a position to do this,” he says from his home in Ottawa. On a day-to-day basis, Rick’s work involves extensive group therapy – primarily on anger management, assertiveness and aftercare – and he is also a residential counsellor at the Pigiarvik House residence, which includes individual counselling, and facilitating cultural and recreational activities. He says working to heal the trauma the Inuit people face – including Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, violence, loss of identity, homelessness and sexual, physical and emotional abuse – is as challenging as his field gets. The Inuit have one of the highest suicide rates in the world at 11 times the national average – 40 times the national average for males aged 15 to 24 – and Canada’s highest rate of violence and violence against women at 10 times the national average. Rick’s journey to Mamisarvik is connected to his own recovery from addiction that began 12 years ago. An NHL writer and sports journalist at the Ottawa Citizen for more than 20 years, Rick’s interest swung to the world of drug and alcohol counselling when he started working on his recovery. “I was so grateful for how things were going and there was a strong element of wanting to give back,” he says. “My whole motivation is to make my work an extension of my own recovery” . As his health improved, Rick’s interest “exploded” in that direction. After leaving the Ottawa Citizen in 1996, he was a freelance reporter for six years in Ottawa before starting at Fleming in 2003.Despite living down the street from Algonquin College, which also has an addiction program, he chose to make the seven-hour round-trip down Highway 7 to Peterborough every week. “One of Fleming’s biggest attractions is that its program is so outstanding. There isn’t one like it in the country.”The fact that the University of Lethbridge accepts every credit in the program at face value was a testament for Rick to the way faculty members Bill Peacock and Joe Ellis built the program. Commuting more than 100 times from Ottawa in a rusty 15-year-old Honda, Rick finished the program at the top of his class with a 95 per cent average. His field placement, arranged by Fleming, took him to the Caribbean island of Antigua to one of the top recovery facilities in the world, Crossroads, founded and owned by musician Eric Clapton. Now Rick is combining is burgeoning knowledge of Inuit culture (he’s even committed to learning the language of Inuktitut) and his passion for journalism. In his down time, he works on writing articles on the plight of the Inuit. “I’m doing advocacy and not just counselling. I’m trying to raise southern awareness to help the the Inuit get the help they need. They seem to have a stranglehold on every negative demographic,” he says. However, despite the tough job of helping Inuit through the many desperate issues they face, he has found counselling very rewarding. “You see the shape people come in, in the first week of the program, and then you see the transformation as they leave after the eighth week – it’s incredible. Seeing that progress so quickly is hugely satisfying, knowing you’ve been a part of that. You’re able to see the impact of the agency’s work quite quickly.” Of the 13 people on staff at Mamisarvik, 10 are Inuit. As a non-Inuit counsellor, “I’ve got the biggest learning curve,” says Rick. “What I can give back is experience, but I’m getting back more than what I am giving.”